Comments on: Who pays for sumo? http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/who-pays-for-sumo/ How to make, save and spend money in Japan. Wed, 18 Feb 2015 03:29:48 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 By: SG http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/who-pays-for-sumo/comment-page-1/#comment-7111 Tue, 22 Jun 2010 12:38:58 +0000 http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/?p=1373#comment-7111 The present gamble-gangster scandal, looks more like a self-inflicted issue and the association management should not just point fingers ! I am sure they are not completely ignorant of the issue, given the history. I am sure eyes-have-seen and ears-have-heard, simply no one wants to take the trouble to correct it. They deserve the public criticism. Bravo to the ex-osumo for bringing up the threat, despite of the fact it will pull his career from him, rather than caving in. I am sure that there is the unspoken threat when a junior refuses to partake when ‘invited’. I pity those whom have joined sumo association with a pure intention. Shame on those whom bring all the bad influence into sumo – national sport.

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By: Orchid64 http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/who-pays-for-sumo/comment-page-1/#comment-6965 Sun, 20 Jun 2010 06:58:14 +0000 http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/?p=1373#comment-6965 The koenkai, or “fan clubs” are a big source of income for wrestlers. It is where they get most of the cash gifts from individuals that you mention. These are people who pay to schmooze with the wrestlers and have them appear at functions. The wrestler shows up and they slip some cash into his pocket essentially.

Also, it’s important to remember that sumo wrestlers have few expenses if they choose. Many of them live in their respective heya and are provided free room and board. Yokozuna and ozeki often live independently, but not always and not until later in their careers.

Sumo is often populated by farm boys and legacy wrestlers. In both cases, they’re not in it to get insanely rich. In one case, they are young men with poor career prospects (often entering around age 15) and in the other they are already in a family with some sumo “wealth” in the form of a toshiyori kabu (a sort of stock in the sumo organization). The toshiyori kabu used to be worth a great deal of money and are what allow people to open their own stables after retirement or become coaches in some other wrestler’s stable.

A lot of sumo cash issues are under the table, but also the way in which the money flows is deep and complex at the upper levels.

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