Comments on: Want more daycare? Pay workers more http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/want-more-daycare-pay-workers-more/ How to make, save and spend money in Japan. Wed, 18 Feb 2015 03:29:48 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 By: john http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/want-more-daycare-pay-workers-more/comment-page-1/#comment-124362 Mon, 12 Nov 2012 13:14:34 +0000 http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/?p=4136#comment-124362 MTC has a bee in his bonnet on this. I wonder if he has kids and has actually experienced the childcare situation in Tokyo. National trend it may not be, but it is still crap for those of us in Tokyo, whichever way you look at it.

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By: jjmb http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/want-more-daycare-pay-workers-more/comment-page-1/#comment-123406 Sun, 04 Nov 2012 20:38:05 +0000 http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/?p=4136#comment-123406 It seems to me that the commentators who say Japan is overpopulated are correct. The Govt could allocate funds if they wanted to solve the problem.

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By: MTC http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/want-more-daycare-pay-workers-more/comment-page-1/#comment-123216 Sat, 03 Nov 2012 03:20:12 +0000 http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/?p=4136#comment-123216 In my previous comment I wrote:

“Tokyo remains far and away the prefecture with the greatest number of children on waiting lists: 7,855 — 32% of the national total.”

This is incorrect. 7,885 is the number of children who were on Tokyo waiting lists on April 1, 2011. The number who were on waiting lists on April 1, 2012 was 7,257 — which is 29%, not 32%, of the national total.

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By: MTC http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/want-more-daycare-pay-workers-more/comment-page-1/#comment-123214 Sat, 03 Nov 2012 03:08:55 +0000 http://blog.japantimes.co.jp/yen-for-living/?p=4136#comment-123214 While the low pay of hoikushi is a national scandal, to assert the existence of a national crisis in daycare is to participate in the propagation of a myth, as the latest government survey on daycare facilities ( http://www.mhlw.go.jp/stf/houdou/2r9852000002khid-att/2r9852000002khju.pdf ) shows.

In between April 1, 2011 and April 1 of this year, the total number of children in daycare and childcare facilities increased by 55,851 to 2,176,802. Over the same period the total number of daycare and childcare facilities in operation increased by 326. The total number of children on waiting lists dropped to 24,825, a 3% decrease from the previous year. Twenty-three prefectures reported having fewer than 50 children on waiting lists; eleven of those reported having no children on waiting lists at all.

Tokyo remains far and away the prefecture with the greatest number of children on waiting lists: 7,855 — 32% of the national total. Inside Tokyo itself Setagaya Ward is widely known to be the municipality with the stiffest competition for places in daycare. Your use of Setagaya as an example of a national urban trend is therefore disappointing.

The myth of a national childcare crisis is particularly insidious as it has given operators of for-profit day care the ammunition with which to lobby legislators into deregulating their industry. It also lulled the public to sleep on the serious implication of the so-called childcare reform of merging the hoikuen and yochien systems, which will benefit no one.

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