Posts Tagged ‘working mothers’

Roomba rules with working moms

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

There has recently been a discussion in the Japanese language media about an article that novelist and Nippon Foundation head Ayako Sono wrote for the magazine Shukan Gendai.

Roomba to move

Roomba to move

Sono, who will turn 82 next week, encouraged working women to quit their jobs after they gave birth, not so much because she believes a mother should devote all her attention to her children, but rather because it is “selfish” for working mothers to place such a burden on the companies they work for by demanding they hire them back at full pay after maternity leave. Women who make such a demand don’t understand reality, Sono says. She herself put up with being “poor” when she had her children, relying on her husband’s salary only, and thinks women today should do the same.

Regardless of Sono’s blinkered view of the reality of married life today, the amount of money that working mothers contribute to the Japanese economy is not chicken feed. It’s estimated to be about ¥6 trillion, according to a cover story in the business magazine Toyo Keizai. The Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications reports that the average disposable income of a double income household is more than ¥4 million a year, while that of a single-income household with a full-time homemaker is about ¥3.6 million.

Moreover, a research laboratory, Dentsu Soken, says that the “direct economic impact” of women who go back to work after giving birth is ¥3 trillion, and the secondary effect of this spending, in terms of added jobs and investment, is worth something like ¥6.4 trillion.

If these women weren’t working they wouldn’t be making that money and thus wouldn’t be spending it, and much of what they spend it on has to do with saving time, because they are so busy with both their jobs and their kids. This waamama (working mother) boom has resulted in brisk sales for three home electronics products that were originally aimed at narrower, higher-income niche targets: washing machines with built-in dryers, dishwashers and robot vacuum cleaners.

It’s the last of these, spearheaded by the American-made Roomba, that has really taken off, and the appeal to working mothers is clear. They simply turn it on and the machine cleans the room by itself, while the mother does other things, like go shopping or play with her children.

The Roomba was originally promoted for seniors, and the price is pretty steep, about ¥80,000, though some discount retailers may sell it for ¥70,000 or even less. The subsequent Japanese copies, made by Toshiba and Sharp, start lower, at about ¥50,000, and are becoming popular, too, but Roomba dominates, with 73 percent of the robot vacuum cleaner market, according to Seed Planning Research. Of course, the household could probably save even more money if the husband chipped in with the housework, but since Sono didn’t talk about that we won’t either.

Want more daycare? Pay workers more

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

Let’s nurture: Daycare center in northern Chiba Prefecture

The Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry just released the results of a survey on quitting. Among the various categories of employment studied, education proved to be the field with the highest percentage of turnover: 48.8 percent of first-time teachers quit their jobs within three years of being hired. Though the study didn’t give reasons for the high turnover rate it isn’t difficult to figure out: Teaching children is a high-stress occupation with little monetary reward.

The same goes for a subset of education, daycare, which continues to pose a very real problem. The lack of daycare facilities for children not old enough to attend school is one of the main reasons young couples are not having more children. According to a recent feature in Tokyo Shimbun, the main reason there are not more daycare centers is that, while demand is increasing as more women remain in the workforce after giving birth, there aren’t enough hoikushi (nursery school teachers). And the reason there aren’t enough hoikushi is that wages are bad and getting worse.

The average monthly pay for a hoikushi, regardless of age or experience, is about ¥200,000, which is almost 40 percent lower than the average monthly pay across the board. But hoikushi tend to work longer hours than the average worker, especially since the Child Welfare Law was revised in 2001, thus allowing more private companies to set up for-profit daycare centers. Average pay for daycare workers dropped after 2001, and private centers tend to hire staff on a non-regular basis, meaning no benefits. According to HLW Ministry statistics, there were 1.12 million licensed daycare workers in Japan in April 2012. However, Tokyo Shimbun reports that few of these people actually work in daycare.

Continue reading about nursery school teachers →

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