Posts Tagged ‘Tsutaya’

Rental video stores ponder their reason for existing

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

Many happy returns: Prepaid mailer for Rakuten DVDs

Many happy returns: Prepaid mailer for Rakuten DVDs

It’s coming up to that time of year again, the long post-Christmas New Years break when days not spent in the company of relatives you can’t stand are wiled away in front of the television airing programs you can’t stand even more. Traditionally, that makes it one of the biggest seasons for the rental video business; or, at least, it used to. The industry has been in a progressive slump since it peaked more than a decade ago.

According to industry group Japan Video Software Association, the number of stores in Japan peaked in 1990, when it stood at 13,529. In 2012 there were only 3,648, a drop of three-fourths. In terms of revenues the biggest year for rental videos was 2004, when the industry took in ¥258.4 billion. It has decreased by about ¥100 billion since then.

A recent article in the Mainichi Shimbun quoted a 41-year-old owner of a rental video store in Yokohama who said that he used to run two other shops but had to close both. There’s not enough demand for him to be able to afford all the new movies coming out on DVD or Blu-Ray, and it’s new titles that have driven rentals in the past. He remembers the days when he could charge ¥1,000 for a new movie for two days, but since then prices have dropped drastically, mainly due to competition from major national chains.

The main culprit, of course, is the march of technology. Though on-demand streaming and downloading isn’t as widespread in Japan as it is in the U.S., the big three mobile phone carriers have started offering movies that can be streamed on TV sets at home. The number of titles right now is only about 7,000, but even at ¥500 per title, it beats trudging down to the local rental store, if one actually exists within trudging distance.

The problem with on-demand is that accessing such services requires a certain level of computer literacy that tends to decline the older the customer is. This is always a problem for IT service companies but may be the last bastion of revenue for rental video stores. An editor from the industry magazine Video Insider Japan told Mainichi that the strategy from now on will be for video stores to target “customers in their 60s and 70s.”

But only the major chains can afford to do that, apparently. Between them, Tsutaya and GEO account for 70 percent of all the rental video stores in Japan, and because they can afford to buy as many new titles as they want, they price smaller stores out of business. Tsutaya, however, is a franchise operation, and individual owners may find it harder to compete against GEO outlets, which are company owned. Since Tsutaya franchise owners can set their own prices, some are being forced to match GEO’s in order to compete, while others are keeping prices higher. It all depends on location. Also, Tsutaya has made exclusive deals with some distributors that give them a distinct advantage. For a time, they were the only company that had permission to rent out “The Amazing Spider-Man.”

However, in order to attract this older cohort that is now the main demographic for rental videos, chain stores have to go to them rather than the other way around. Both Tsutaya and GEO offer plans wherein customers pay a set monthly fee for a certain number of disks that are delivered directly to their homes. This system has been available for about 10 years, and the only real innovative change has been the addition of so-called spot rentals, meaning members can order videos a la carte without having to sign up for a plan. Right now, GEO is offering some titles for as low as ¥80, with Tsutaya offering ¥100 (both for limited times). What’s interesting about spot rentals is that, depending on which videos you rent and how many, they can be cheaper than monthly plans.

GEO has three monthly plans. The standard plan is ¥945 for four DVDs. After that there’s an 8-disc plan for a little less than ¥2,000, and a 16-disc plan for a bit less than ¥4,000. When you sign up for a plan you get the first month free, but the real difference is in the delivery fee. Whether your order is a spot rental or part of a monthly plan, the fee is ¥300 for up to seven discs at a time. The fee is ¥500 for orders of 8-16 disks. Regardless of the size of the order, the time limit is 10 days from the day the customer receives the disks. As with all such home delivery systems, the company includes a prepaid envelope for returning the discs. However, it’s important to note that GEO does not charge a late fee for people who belong to monthly plans. Late fees for spot rentals are ¥157 a day.

But GEO and Tsutaya now have to contend with an upstart: Rakuten. The Internet mall’s inventory isn’t as deep or wide as the other two companies, but its spot rental system is in many ways cheaper and more amenable to the way most people rent videos. Rakuten also charges ¥300 for delivery fee, but you can only request up to two discs per order. After that the delivery fee increases in increments of ¥200. In that regard, GEO would seem to have the advantage, but actually not. Brand new titles are priced the same as GEO’s, around ¥300, but older titles are usually priced at around ¥50. And titles that are more than, say, two years old can be as cheap as ¥10 or even ¥5.

Like GEO, the time limit for a Rakuten spot rental is 10 days, but if you see two discs over the course of two days you return the discs and can immediately order two more. They usually arrive within a day of placing the order. For sure, the delivery fee for GEO is cheaper, but if you took full advantage of the fee and ordered 7 discs, you’d still have to watch all of them in less than 10 days, and even at ¥80 per disc, they aren’t as cheap as Rakuten’s.

Rakuten’s system is especially rational if you want to watch full seasons of TV series. Last month we watched the second season of “Homeland,” which, because it’s relatively new, cost ¥280 per disc, with two episodes per DVD. But we also went through the first two seasons of “Mad Men,” which were only ¥5-¥10 per disc, also with 2-3 episodes per disc. And they always had the DVDs we wanted in stock. It beats trudging down to the rental video store.

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