Posts Tagged ‘travel’

Summertime blues: no place to go or no money to spend?

Friday, August 10th, 2012

Last week, the research department of Meiji Yasuda Life Insurance released the results of its annual summer vacation survey. For the second year in a row, projected spending for summer vacation dropped from the previous year’s spending. On average, households say they plan to spend ¥82,974 this year, down from ¥84,848 last year. It is not the lowest amount on record, however. In 2008, households said they would spend ¥76,955, but that was the year after the subprime crisis and the Lehman Brothers “shock.” The next year, spending recovered but has been declining ever since.

What the roads won’t look like in the middle of August.

Yasuda hasn’t analyzed these findings, so it’s not entirely clear if the reason for the decline is lack of disposable income due to the ongoing recession or fear of spending any money because of an uncertain future. However, the amount of spending jumps considerably when children aren’t involved. Households consisting only of couples said they would spend on average ¥100,191, which is much more than it was last year. A relatively large number of couples say they will be traveling overseas.

In any case, the majority of all respondents said they would stick close to home this summer, 62 percent, to be precise. It’s the seventh year in a row that “staying at home” topped the list of answers to the question, “What do you plan to do?” Other answers (respondents can tick more than one) included “return to my home town” (39.4 percent), travel domestically (37.4 percent), and visit theme parks, public pools, camping sites, etc. Among the reasons given for staying at home this year, the most common was “to recover my strength,” followed by “it costs too much to travel.”

It’s unfortunate that Yasuda didn’t get even more detailed in this line of inquiry. For example, of the people who said they would visit their home towns, 52 percent also said they would get there by automobile. Considering the monumental “u-turn rush” traffic jams that occur during the specified holiday period, it might have been interesting to find out how many people decided not to go home because of traffic jams and crowded trains. It’s easy to blame apathy about summer vacation on economics, but logistics has a lot to do with it, too, especially when they’re qualified by financial considerations. These things all go together.

Budget airline determined to give passengers their money’s worth

Monday, June 18th, 2012

As more and more airlines struggle with fluctuating fuel costs, labor disputes and competition that puts downward pressure on fares, they cut wherever they can, and for passengers the clearest sign of this trend is the loss of services once considered standard. It started with charging for drinks and meals on shorter flights, then charging for a second checked bag or even the first. Ireland’s premier budget carrier Ryanair has taken these cost-cutting measures to almost laughable extremes.

Skymark home page

Japanese carriers have always had the highest reputation for service, which is one of the reasons Japanese fliers remained faithful for so long and paid extra for those services. The JAL bankruptcy proved that this was no longer the case, and in recent years Japanese airlines have had to genuinely compete with others for customers, even Japanese customers. Now budget Japanese carriers have softened service, and some think that one of the pioneers, Skymark, has gone too far.

Earlier this month the media covered the airline’s “service concept,” which, in practical terms, doesn’t really make a huge difference in a passenger’s in-flight experience. However, the way it was presented seemed geared to offend. According to the Asahi Shimbun’s reports, the “instructions,” printed on B5-size pieces of paper and inserted in seat pockets on aircraft starting May 18, state that flight attendants are not obligated to “help passengers stow luggage on board the aircraft,” meaning that passengers are totally responsible for their own bags. More to the point, the instructions also state that attendants and other staff do not have to “use the polite language that airlines conventionally use.” And except for the company-issued polo shirts and windbreakers, staff can dress or make up any way they want.

After the media made a big deal of the service concept, Skymark announced that it did not constitute any sort of change but was a “clarification” of policies already in effect. The transportation ministry was mainly concerned with the “tone” of the clarification, which seemed to be a “challenge to” rather than a “violation of” existing regulations. In particular, the ministry was concerned that Skymark’s refusal to “accept complaints” from passengers on matters that “don’t directly affect customers” might cause problems.

Continue reading about budget airlines in Japan →

Do your part and take a vacation

Monday, March 1st, 2010

Hello Kitty wants you to relax on weekdays and Sundays

Hello Kitty wants you to relax on weekdays and Sundays

A year ago when the Liberal Democratic Party reduced highway tolls to a maximum of ¥1,000 on designated expressways for passenger cars on weekends, the stated reason was to stimulate the economy, and to a certain extent it worked. Gas consumption went up and highway rest areas saw booming business.

But tourist destinations didn’t necessarily benefit, mainly because people who used the ¥1,000 toll as an excuse to get the family out of the house didn’t stay overnight anywhere. If families or even individuals took advantage of the lower tolls, it was for day excursions. There are many reasons for that, but the obvious one is that Japanese accommodations are most expensive on Saturday nights. In fact, a tourist industry symposium reported late last year that after the highway toll reduction went into effect there was a 6 percent drop in weekday tourist business, which had been gradually growing in recent years, and this drop was not necessarily compensated on the weekend.

For years, the tourist industry has been trying to boost demand for weekday travel, but it’s difficult in Japan where holiday periods are set in stone and full-time workers are still reluctant to ask for days off for reasons of recreation. The average full-time employee in Japan is entitled to 18 days of paid vacation a year, but only uses half that time. The symposium estimates that if all these workers used their paid vacations in full, the Japanese economy would benefit by ¥16 trillion and 1.88 million new jobs. You wouldn’t need foreign tourists if everyone took their rightful time off.

Continue reading about ways to stimulate tourism →

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