Posts Tagged ‘setsuden’

Energy conservation isn’t just for summers any more

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

Last summer when the antinuclear movement was receiving a lot of media coverage, the government and utilities justified their plans for reopening nuclear power plants with statistics purportedly showing how dangerously close to capacity electricity usage is in the summer, when everyone has their air conditioners on. Thanks to energy conservation efforts on everyone’s part there were no overloads, but in terms of households, reibo (cooling) only accounts for 2 percent of overall energy usage when measured in calories. Danbo (heating), on the other hand, accounts for 25 percent of home-energy usage.

Fill ‘er up: Kerosene station in Chiba

Of course, there are various methods for heating homes in Japan. In addition to electricity, there is natural gas, liquid propane gas and kerosene (toyu), but electricity has been increasing in recent decades as a means for home-heating. Between 1980 and 2005, the use of kerosene, which is utilized in space-heating “stoves,” declined from 71 to 45 percent in terms of heating needs in the Kanto area, while both natural gas and LPG increased from 21 to 35 percent and electricity from 8 to 20 percent. However, when you factor in all of a home’s energy needs — cooking, lighting, bathing, etc. — electricity accounts for 50 percent, kerosene 17 percent, natural gas 20 percent and LPG 10 percent of household energy consumption. That was for all homes in Japan in 2009. In 1973, electricity only accounted for 28 percent of overall household energy usage. So with the promotion of all-electric houses in recent years, the overall portion of home heating by electricity has probably gone up even more.

The peak period for electricity usage in the wintertime is between 5 and 6 p.m., and during the current sharp cold spell, electricity usage as reported by Tokyo Electric Power has been over 90 percent during the peak time slot. The main difference between wintertime and summertime is that power plants reduce capacity in the winter, so 90 percent represents less power usage in the winter than it does in the summer. Most air conditioners run on electricity, but as shown above heating systems use a variety of methods, so electrical usage is deemed to be less. But since electricity usage in the winter is on the increase, why aren’t power companies warning people to cut back when the usage gets close to the limit, as they did last summer?

Continue reading about wintertime energy conservation →

Breaker, breaker: How to conserve energy without thinking too much

Wednesday, July 4th, 2012

Power trip: electrical panel with 30-ampere main breaker switch

Last Monday the summer setsuden (electricity-saving) campaign started. All the regional utilities except Okinawa’s are requesting that customers cut back on their energy use so as not to put a strain on the grid, which has been compromised by the shutdown of so many nuclear power plants in the wake of last year’s meltdown at the Fukushima No. 1 reactors. As evidenced by the large anti-nuclear demonstrations taking place, a lot of people have strong feelings about atomic energy, but whether you believe it to be too dangerous to handle or an acceptable alternative to carbon-based sources, the best way to address the more pressing issue of energy shortages is to reduce usage.

Though there are many piecemeal methods for saving energy, one way to immediately cut down is to exchange your main circuit breaker, the gatekeeper for the current that flows into your home. Power is measured by means of watts, and the number printed on your breaker, which stands for amperes, represents the maximum amount of wattage that can pass into your home at one time. Different household appliances use different amounts of power. Anything that cooks or produces heat will use more power than other appliances. When the amount of power flowing into your home exceeds the ampere level of your breaker, it automatically trips, causing a blackout, but only in your home. If you use a lot of electricity, then you should install a breaker with a higher ampere number.

In Japan, household breakers come in seven steps, from 10 amperes to 60. The higher the number, the higher the basic charge on your monthly electricity bill. If you are a Tokyo Electric Power Co. customer you pay ¥273 for 10 amperes, ¥409 for 15, ¥546 for 20, ¥819 for 30, ¥1,092 for 40, ¥1,365 for 50 and ¥1,638 for 60. In order to figure out which breaker level is appropriate, take a survey of all your household appliances and how often you use each one.

Continue reading about easy energy consevation →

Which appliance is the energy hog? It’s not your air conditioner

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

See that red button on the right...

Actually, in terms of overall electricity usage in households, air conditioners use the most on a continual basis, followed by refrigerators. But on a unit per hour basis, air conditioners are not that bad, even though they’ve been made the villain by the media. Broadcasters, in particular, are offering tips to households on how to cut down on energy consumption and the main suggestion is to set your air conditioner at 28 degrees centigrade. Because so many people, in particular the elderly, have fallen victim to heat stroke, no one is saying to turn off the air conditioner any more, but the general consensus is that the average air conditioner in the average home uses about 130 watts of energy and, overall, accounts for a bit less than a fourth of the summer electricity bill, which gives you some idea of the savings potential.

What the media doesn’t say, according to an article in the most recent issue of Shukan Post, is that there is another appliance in your house that actually uses more electricity. A typical large screen (over 37 inches) LCD television set uses on average 220 watts, or 70 percent more energy than the air conditioner if both are being used continuously, but, of course, media companies aren’t going to suggest you turn off the TV because that would hurt their business.

Continue reading about the most power-hungry appliance →

Cool to be kind: Air conditioners for the needy

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

Yamada Denki's cheapest air conditioner

On Aug. 1, the Tokyo prefectural government started a program that provides up to ¥40,000 to certain households so that they can buy air conditioners and have them installed. Considering how much newsprint, cyberspace and air time has been dedicated this summer to the subject of saving energy and the amount of electricity an air conditioner uses, it seems a rather strange program. According to the Tokyo Shimbun, only about 700 households are estimated to qualify for the grant. To receive the money the household must already be receiving welfare from the central government and have at least one member over 65 years of age whose physician recommends an air conditioner to prevent heat stroke.

It’s the first time any government, local or otherwise, has earmarked specific funds so that private individuals can buy air conditioners. Until, say, 25 years ago in Japan, air conditioners were considered luxuries, which meant that welfare recipients couldn’t even own one if they wanted to continue receiving benefits. In Japan, traditionally, owning certain household appliances, or even a car, meant that automatically you couldn’t receive welfare, regardless of your income because such items indicated you had spent the money you received on something you didn’t need to survive, even if, in fact, you had received said item before going on welfare. That’s the reasoning behind welfare: Receiving the minimum to get by. Even TVs were forbidden at one time, and it was common for welfare recipients to hide them when the social worker (minseiin) came to check up on them. Obviously, air conditioners are now considered necessities.

Continue reading about loans for air conditioners →

RSS

Recent posts