Posts Tagged ‘post office’

Backsliding Japan Post broadens its horizons on all fronts

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

While you’re out, drop by the post office to pick up some stamps . . . and a mortgage

On Oct. 1, two divisions of the Nihon Yusei Group, in English known as Japan Post Holdings, or JP, will consolidate. If you were never aware that four separate companies make up the post office service — Yubin Kyoku, Nihon Yubin Jigyo, Yucho Ginko and Kampo Seimei — then you shouldn’t feel embarrassed. The vast majority of Japanese don’t know about it either, so the merger of the two postal-related services, Yubin Kyoku, which manages the post office system, and Nihon Yubin Jigyo, which manages mail delivery, into one entity called Nihon Yubin may hardly qualify as news to most people.

In fact, most people will wonder what actually distinguishes these two entities. Aren’t the business of managing post offices and the business of delivering mail part and parcel of the same general enterprise? Apparently not, though you’d have to actually work in either of those companies to understand why. Perhaps the best way to explain this conundrum is to look at one of the new services that will be offered after the consolidation takes place, something called tsucho azukari.

With this service, a person who has a savings account at Yucho Ginko (Japan Post Bank) can entrust (azukari) his or her passbook (tsucho) to a regular delivery person, who brings it to the bank so that an employee can carry out a desired transaction on the person’s behalf. Logic would say this sounds like a cooperative service between Nihon Yubin Jigyo, the delivery arm of JP, and Yucho Ginko, the banking arm of JP, but all Yucho Ginko are located in JP post offices, which means it’s really a cooperative service betweeh Nihon Yubin and Yubin Kyoku.

Tsucho azukari is actually a traditional service, especially for the elderly in rural areas where it is sometimes difficult to make it to the post office. But in the past, it was an informal service, simply something that a delivery person did for someone on his route as a personal favor. The new service will be implemented initially on a trial basis at only 52 of JP’s 24,000 post offices. The service itself is less important than what it represents, a reversal of the postal decentralization that former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi made his life’s work and which started in 2007.

Continue reading about the birth of Nihon Yubin →

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