Posts Tagged ‘Olympics’

Foreign tourists expected to take up (some of) the slack in consumption

Monday, October 6th, 2014

Everyday low prices: Duty Free store at Narita Airport

Everyday low prices: Duty Free store at Narita Airport

According to a survey of 12,000 tourists in 2013 carried out by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, the Chinese spend more than any other group, which isn’t surprising. What is surprising is by how much they outspend other nationalities.

On average, a Chinese visitor spends ¥191,741 in Tokyo. The average spent by all foreign tourists in Tokyo is only ¥46,546, which means Chinese spend about three times as much.

After China, the most spent is by Singaporeans (¥135,377), and then Spaniards (¥129,558). Another notable aspect of Chinese spending is that the bulk is not spend on accommodations or dining, but rather on souvenirs, about ¥122,000. The most popular area for Chinese shoppers is Ginza, because that’s where all the luxury brand stores are.

The government wants them to spend even more, and is thus expanding the list of items that foreign tourists can buy without having to pay consumption tax. Previously, consumables like food, liquor and cosmetics were not exempt from CT when bought by foreign tourists at stores in Japan, but since Oct. 1 they are.

The main beneficiary of this new regulation is department stores, which have been doing badly since the consumption tax went up in April. One of the reasons consumables weren’t exempt before was that there was no way to check if the items were consumed in Japan or overseas, and anything consumed in Japan should be subject to tax. But many Chinese buy food and liquor in Japan as souvenirs for relatives and friends.

The discount is given at the point of purchase, which means the store has to be registered to waive the consumption tax. They check the buyers passport to make sure he or she is not a Japanese national. Technically, the item can be checked at the airport to make sure it wasn’t consumed before leaving the country, but that sounds almost impossible to do.

At present foreign tourism is one of the only bright spots in terms of revenues. In August, spending by foreign tourists was 40 percent more than it was last August, and ¥4.7 billion of it was spent in department stores alone. These numbers will probably go up more now that the yen is dropping.

The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry estimates that the new duty-free rule will mean a loss of ¥9 billion in CT revenues for the year, but it will also mean a boost in sales of about ¥78 billion, which means it will make up for at least some of the domestic consumption that was lost after the tax increase was implemented.

The duty free system was established in the early 1950s, when less than 40,000 foreign tourists visited Japan in a year. Department stores have always been lobbying the government to expand the list of exempt items, even though administering the system is bothersome for retailers, as well as for tourists, who have to fill out forms. METI is thus thinking of streamlining the system even more by 2020, when the Olympics will be held. At present 5,777 stores belong to the duty-free system.

The new National Stadium will have to rock you

Sunday, June 8th, 2014

The show must go on: Attendees of a sayonara event at the National Stadium snap photos of an air show held on June 6.

The show must go on: Attendees of a sayonara event at the National Stadium snap photos of an air show held on June 4. KYODO

The old National Olympic Stadium in Tokyo closed down at the end of May with a big sendoff: two days of star-packed concerts in front of a capacity crowd. As everyone knows, the venue is being torn down to make way for an even bigger structure for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, an endeavor that continues to court controversy due to its projected size and cost, not to mention what it will likely do to the neighborhood around it.

Originally, the estimate for the new stadium was ¥300 billion, but mysteriously this figure was decreased to ¥169 billion just prior to the final bid. According to Professor Tomoyuki Suzuki, who was in charge of preparing Tokyo’s unsuccessful bid for the 2016 Games, construction costs for public facilities always end up rising over time, but neither the 2020 Tokyo bid organization nor the Japan Olympic Committee has ever explained that bit of conventional wisdom to the public. He told Tokyo Shimbun last April that the estimate was simply based on a number “that was most likely to be accepted.”

There is also the question of what to do with the stadium after the Olympics. The JOC is predicting that it will show a surplus of ¥400 million a year, but as Suzuki points out, this projection is based on the premise that the stadium will host 12 major pop concerts a year, and that, he believes, is impossible, unless the stadium foregoes sporting events, which is what it’s being built for in the first place.

The main problem with using stadiums for concerts, especially stadiums that hold field events like soccer, is that the playing surfaces are used for seating, which has a tendency to destroy the grass. Suzuki cites Ajinomoto Stadium in Western Tokyo, which is the home field of the FC Tokyo soccer team. In 2008, the stadium operators rented the facility to a promoter who held a rock concert attended by almost 80,000 people. Despite FC Tokyo’s protests, the concert went ahead, and afterwards the stadium had to spend “tens of millions of yen” to change the grass on the entire field in time for an FC Tokyo match.

CONTINUE READING about stadium rock to come →

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