Posts Tagged ‘dairy products’

Where’s the milk? School lunches no longer sacred cows

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Screen shot of February lunch menus for an elementary school in Gifu Prefecture

The February lunch menu for an elementary school in Gifu Prefecture

Last Saturday was the start of Gakko Kyushoku Shukan (School Lunch Week), an annual celebration of the meals that public elementary and junior high school students in Japan enjoy every day by force of law.

School lunches have been a point of pride for Japan’s education institutions, a means of integrating lifelong health maintenance into the standard curriculum. On another level, mandatory school lunches, as the late writer Kuniko Mukoda once famously pointed out, was the basis for the widespread idea that all Japanese belonged to the “middle class.”

Several years ago, the government said it wanted to reinforce “food education,” though it hardly seems necessary since the school lunch program already does that, and very effectively. According to law, all public school children below high school must buy lunch, and those who cannot afford it receive subsidies from the authorities. Each school will have its own nutritionist to make sure the children receive properly balanced meals. In terms of cost, the ingredients for the meals will be paid for by the students, meaning their parents, while labor, maintenance and other related expenses are taken care of by local governments with help from the central government.

This latter element has lately been challenged as more local governments look for ways to cut their budgets. Last summer, Sanjo, a city in Niigata Prefecture, “experimentally” stopped serving milk with lunches at 30 public schools. The ostensible reason, according to the mayor, was that parents complained that milk doesn’t fit in with the Japanese cuisine the schools served.

CONTINUE READING about school lunches →

When protecting farmers hurts consumers — and farmers

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Sign in dairy case telling shoppers they are limited to only one package of butter per person

Sign in dairy case telling shoppers they are limited to only one package of butter per person

Butter isn’t as essential in Japanese cuisine as it is in certain other countries’ national styles of cooking, but it does have its place, most commonly in white sauces and baking, and anyone here who uses it regularly has had to pay premium prices for it. Lately, they’ve been paying even more.

In a recent Asahi Shimbun feature a housewife shopping in Minato Ward, Tokyo, is tempted to pick up a package of “luxury brand” butter because all the regular butter is sold out, but in the end she leaves the store without it because she just can’t see spending that much money. The article doesn’t say what that price is, but regular butter right now is said to cost “¥400 or more” for 200 grams, and the luxury butter is “twice as expensive.”

The implication is that ¥400 is already too much to pay, but in any case wherever you go, regular butter tends to be sold out, and many supermarkets now limit customers to only one package per trip. More significantly, businesses such as ramen restaurants and bakeries, which rely on butter as an essential ingredient, are also suffering from the price increase. That’s because there is an acute butter shortage.

And the reason there’s a butter shortage is that there’s a milk shortage and butter is the least prioritized of dairy products. Most milk that’s produced in Japan is sold as milk, and only when there is milk left over after being channeled into by-products like cheese and yogurt does butter get made. Unlike most other dairy products, butter can be frozen and stored for a long period of time.

CONTINUE READING about Japan's butter shortage →

Inflation Watch: Food manufacturers offering less

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

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Use your noodle: ¥198 regular price 5-pack of Aeon instant ramen vs. ¥198 sale price 3-pack of Sapporo Ichiban instant chanpon

Economists in Japan have been carefully scrutinizing buying trends since the consumption tax was raised in April. Everyone has noted that buying has dipped by at least 4 percent since the 3 percent tax hike went into effect, but many think that it will rebound later in the year since so many consumers bought a lot of stuff just before the hike. And it is also true that some prices of goods and services have gone up, as well, especially food, but for the most part makers have tried to keep them the same, despite the fact that the lower yen has resulted in higher prices for imported ingredients, not to mention increased demand for all food products in developing countries. In addition, the higher price of oil has boosted the cost for packaging.

There’s, of course, one tried-and-true solution to the problem of stabilizing resale prices when costs go up: reducing volume. Rather than raise prices, especially at a time when consumers are specially sensitive to any change, manufacturers trim the amount being sold, according to Asahi Shimbun. Nippon Ham, for instance, did not change prices on 82 items in its product line but did reduce the amount being sold by an average of 10 percent. The company’s European sausage used to come in bags of 7 weighing 140 grams. For the same price, it’s now 6 sausages, or 120 grams. The company’s main competitor, Ito Ham, however, has decided to take a chance and increased the price of its pork products, saying that it was inevitable because worldwide demand for pork has risen recently.

The confection industry has been affected as well. Lotte cut the volume and weight of 6 products. Meiji shrunk 10 of its chocolate items, citing a 20 percent increase in cocoa prices from two years ago: Its best-selling Almond Chocolate treat went from 23 pieces to 21.

Chain restaurants are also dealing with the environment. Ringer Hut has increased prices on a number of its chanpon dishes by 3 to 5 percent, mainly due to higher prices for shrimp grown in Thailand, as well as higher transportation costs.

CONTINUE READING about cost-cutting measures →

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