Posts Tagged ‘consumption tax’

Foreign tourists expected to take up (some of) the slack in consumption

Monday, October 6th, 2014

Everyday low prices: Duty Free store at Narita Airport

Everyday low prices: Duty Free store at Narita Airport

According to a survey of 12,000 tourists in 2013 carried out by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, the Chinese spend more than any other group, which isn’t surprising. What is surprising is by how much they outspend other nationalities.

On average, a Chinese visitor spends ¥191,741 in Tokyo. The average spent by all foreign tourists in Tokyo is only ¥46,546, which means Chinese spend about three times as much.

After China, the most spent is by Singaporeans (¥135,377), and then Spaniards (¥129,558). Another notable aspect of Chinese spending is that the bulk is not spend on accommodations or dining, but rather on souvenirs, about ¥122,000. The most popular area for Chinese shoppers is Ginza, because that’s where all the luxury brand stores are.

The government wants them to spend even more, and is thus expanding the list of items that foreign tourists can buy without having to pay consumption tax. Previously, consumables like food, liquor and cosmetics were not exempt from CT when bought by foreign tourists at stores in Japan, but since Oct. 1 they are.

CONTINUE READING about new duty-free lists →

Inflation Watch: Food manufacturers offering less

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

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Use your noodle: ¥198 regular price 5-pack of Aeon instant ramen vs. ¥198 sale price 3-pack of Sapporo Ichiban instant chanpon

Economists in Japan have been carefully scrutinizing buying trends since the consumption tax was raised in April. Everyone has noted that buying has dipped by at least 4 percent since the 3 percent tax hike went into effect, but many think that it will rebound later in the year since so many consumers bought a lot of stuff just before the hike. And it is also true that some prices of goods and services have gone up, as well, especially food, but for the most part makers have tried to keep them the same, despite the fact that the lower yen has resulted in higher prices for imported ingredients, not to mention increased demand for all food products in developing countries. In addition, the higher price of oil has boosted the cost for packaging.

There’s, of course, one tried-and-true solution to the problem of stabilizing resale prices when costs go up: reducing volume. Rather than raise prices, especially at a time when consumers are specially sensitive to any change, manufacturers trim the amount being sold, according to Asahi Shimbun. Nippon Ham, for instance, did not change prices on 82 items in its product line but did reduce the amount being sold by an average of 10 percent. The company’s European sausage used to come in bags of 7 weighing 140 grams. For the same price, it’s now 6 sausages, or 120 grams. The company’s main competitor, Ito Ham, however, has decided to take a chance and increased the price of its pork products, saying that it was inevitable because worldwide demand for pork has risen recently.

The confection industry has been affected as well. Lotte cut the volume and weight of 6 products. Meiji shrunk 10 of its chocolate items, citing a 20 percent increase in cocoa prices from two years ago: Its best-selling Almond Chocolate treat went from 23 pieces to 21.

Chain restaurants are also dealing with the environment. Ringer Hut has increased prices on a number of its chanpon dishes by 3 to 5 percent, mainly due to higher prices for shrimp grown in Thailand, as well as higher transportation costs.

CONTINUE READING about cost-cutting measures →

The price is right, but sometimes difficult to read

Sunday, April 27th, 2014

Do the right thing: this supermarket tells customers that all prices indicated include the consumption tax

A quick survey by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communiciations has revealed that the average price of goods and services, excluding “fresh produce,” since the consumption tax hike went into effect April 1 has increased 2.7 percent, which sounds about right since the hike itself was 3 percent. When the consumer price index is announced next month, the ministry projects that it will be 3 percent higher than it was a year ago, so everything is going as planned.

Of course, that’s the word from on high. Here in the real world, meaning in the stores where we all shop, the situation isn’t that clear-cut.

Some consumers will notice that prices have gone up much more than what they would perceive as 3 percent, while some prices have actually gone down, and many prices have stayed the same.

CONTINUE READING about post sales-tax prices →

Tax structure encourages getting wasted

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

Zero's not in it: Selection of Suntory chuhai at discount store

Zero’s not in it: Selection of Suntory chuhai at discount store

There’s no end to speculation as to how the consumption tax increase in April will affect the country, socially as well as economically. Last week, Tokyo Shimbun published a conversation between a college professor and one of its reporters about the effect on beer prices and, in turn, beer consumption, which last year declined for the ninth year in a row.

When the reporter asks the professor about this effect the professor feigns amazement that the reporter, who specializes in tax matters, didn’t know that “42 percent of the price you pay for your beer is already tax.” He goes on to explain that the beer tax is a holdover from the 19th century, when beer was considered a luxury item. Since then it’s become much more the drink of common people thanks to improved and cheaper refrigeration, but the government liked the revenues too much and maintained the tax structure for beer. To the professor’s thinking, the tax should be pegged to alcoholic content, and since beer’s is relatively low the tax should also be lower than it is for other alcoholic beverages.

It’s easy to get people to pay the tax since it isn’t indicated on the package or even at the place of sale, unlike the consumption tax. For the sake of reference, when you buy a 350-ml can of beer you pay ¥77 in tax. If you bought the same volume of whiskey you’d pay ¥129 in tax; shochu ¥70, nihonshu ¥42 and wine ¥28.

Basically, that means the consumption tax is levied on a tax, since the consumption tax is determined by the price that the wholesaler and retailer pays for the product, which, by the time they receive it, already includes the alcohol tax that is levied at the manufacturing stage. “When the government said they’d increase the consumption tax, people got angry,” says the professor. “But no one says anything about the alcohol tax, because people don’t notice it.” The reporter thinks that a “tax on a tax” violates the principle of taxation. The professor doesn’t disagree, and adds that beer accounts for half the revenues brought in by the alcohol tax. Because beer makers are large companies with responsible accounting practices, it’s easy for the Finance Ministry to collect the tax. The reporter says, “Why don’t manufacturers get angry?”

Actually, that’s why they started making the “beer-like” happoshu in the late ’90s. Because the ingredients used in happoshu are different from those that define beer for tax purposes, the beer tax doesn’t apply, and so makers could sell it at a much lower price. The government, of course, didn’t like that and eventually raised the tax rate for happoshu, too, though not as high as it is for beer (¥46 for a 350-ml can). Makers came back again with dai-san (third type) beverages, which use fermented soybeans for flavor instead of hops, and that got around the happoshu tax (¥28 for 350-ml). But while these new, cheaper brews outsold “real” beer handily, sales for all three beverages have still decreased over time, due to the shrinking population and a younger generation of consumers who don’t drink as much as their parents did.

In that regard, beer makers don’t see much of an impact of the consumption tax hike on beer and beer-like beverage sales; or, at least, they don’t see any point in trying to offset the hike. But they are modifying their lines of canned drinks that contain shochu, colloquially called chuhai. As the price of chuhai goes up thanks to the consumption tax, they are increasing the alcohol content. In fact, many companies have already added more alcohol to their chuhai products.

Kirin Beer increased its Hyoketsu Strong from 8 percent to 9 percent alcohol, and in April it will boost its Hon-shibori Lime chuhai drink from 6 to 8 percent.

Asahi Beer is already advertising its new Karakuchi Shochu Highball, which is 8 percent, in a bid to persuade normal fans of high balls — whiskey and soda — to switch to shochu and soda. That’s a full 5 percentage points higher than Asahi’s other chuhai, Slat, and both beverages will be sold for the same price. (Note: Slat is aimed at young women and the word suggests slimness, though an English speaker may be forgiven for thinking the name an unfortunate choice for such a target group.)

Suntory’s chuhai product, -196 Degrees C Strong, which enjoyed a 22 percent share of the chuhai market in 2012 thanks to its already hefty alcohol content, will be strengthened from 8 to 9 percent. The company told Asahi Shimbun that it expects sales to grow by 8 percent.

The target is middle-aged and elderly men, the main demographic for alcoholic beverages anyway. Makers think they will be attracted to the cost effectiveness, according to the Asahi, which means they can “get drunk more easily” for the same amount of money. In many countries, tax on alcohol is referred to as a “sin tax,” since it has a double-edged purpose: raising revenues on a product or service that may be harmful to society, on the one hand, and on the other checking consumption of the harmful product or service by making it more expensive.

This latter purpose doesn’t seem to apply in Japan, where alcohol companies have figured out a way to use the tax structure to their advantage. There’s no sin in that.

Consumption tax rush approaching peak time

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

Curb your enthusiasm: Don't rush out and buy an aircon to beat the tax hike since it will probably be cheaper afterwards anyway

Curb your enthusiasm: Don’t rush out and buy an aircon to beat the tax hike since it will probably be cheaper afterwards anyway

Retailers continue to enjoy good business in the runup to the consumption tax hike on April 1, but some are a bit anxious that consumers may not understand the situation sufficiently. Tokyo Shimbun visited a few Tokyo department stores where the rush to buy is especially intense, causing them to post clarifying announcements to head off any attendant disappointment.

At Isetan, these notices are posted prominently in the furniture and bedding sections, as well as the eyeglass section, meaning departments where people order merchandise and then take delivery later. As one Isetan employee explained to the paper, the consumption tax is applied on the day of receipt of merchandise, not on the day it was ordered or even on the day it was paid for. A good portion of department store sales are order-made products, and the notices are cautioning customers to make sure they understand the date their stuff will be ready to pick up, otherwise they may end up paying more than they thought they would.

Keio department store is telling all its customers about the rule so that “there is no misunderstanding.” Daimaru Matsuzaka, near Tokyo Station, has seen sales of order-made men’s suits climb to 14.4 percent higher than last year, a new record, but the closer they get to March the more nervous they are since some suits take longer to make than others. Takashimaya in Nihonbashi is apparently the most conscientious department store, posting very detailed explanations in all its sections that insist the earlier you order something, the more likely it will be you can avoid the extra 3 percent charge.

However, a related article in the weekly Aera says that consumers shouldn’t worry that much, since there’s a good chance people will buy something now to avoid the tax hike only to end up paying more. Some retailers are not as straightforward as the above-mentioned department stores, using the rush as a means of getting customers to sign up for credit cards in order to compound their savings without realizing that in the end they’ll probably have to pay handling fees that will negate such savings, unless they happen to be frequent patrons of the store, in which case they probably already have a card. The magazine interviewed a few housewives who plan to make big purchases ahead of the tax hike.

One woman says she is going to buy all new household appliances, while another in her early 30s will buy baby shower and wedding gifts for friends who will celebrate these happy events in the near future, but as she said, “often these gifts go on sale in July, so I don’t know if I’m actually saving money by buying them now.”

A financial planner told Aera that it may be a mistake to buy some big ticket items now. Air conditioner sales, for instance, tend to be their lowest in March, which is between the cold and the hot seasons. That’s also when manufacturers put out new models, which means last year models will be quite cheap, so he advises to wait. Even after April 1, the price could be considerably less than they are now, even taking the tax hike into consideration. But automobiles and home improvement work, he says, should be ordered right now, if it already isn’t too late, because they require time before final delivery and there are no bargain sales associated with either. For mini-cars (kei jidosha), in particular, now is the time to buy since next year the car tax for buying one will increase by 50 percent.

In the end, here are items that Aera recommends buying now to beat the tax: household appliances; over-the-counter drugs that can be stored for long periods, like aspirin; gold, since the purchaser can buy at a lower tax rate and sell at a higher one; theme park tickets; long-term commuting passes and train tickets in bulk (kaisuken).

Items that Aera doesn’t recommend buying now: PCs and TVs, because they always go on sale; apparel and accessories, which tend to be much cheaper during semiannual bargain sales; real estate and stocks; gems and platinum, which, unlike gold, are more vulnerable to price fluctuations; and everyday necessities like toilet paper, which people all over the world tend to buy up whenever there is some sort of financial panic.

Deflation Watch: New Year’s scorecard

Sunday, January 12th, 2014

Bottomless: Bargain bulk sale on diapers at discount store

Bottomless: Bargain bulk sale on diapers at discount store

In a chat with Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, the weekly magazine Aera asked him about the prospects of “Abenomics,” which Krugman has supported. He still supports it, but thinks that the consumption tax hike to 8 percent next April was a “bad decision” that may ruin all the good things that Abenomics could achieve. He recommends that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe either cancel the increase or postpone it.

It’s probably too late for that, which explains Abe’s recent desperate attempts to get Japan’s businesses to promise to boost salaries, none of which seem to be working. In a recent Kyodo News survey of 104 “key” companies, only 17 percent say they plan to increase pay in 2014, but none will carry out basic salary increases across the board, what’s known in Japanese business parlance as “base up.” The feeling is that they’ll increase wages for some workers, maybe through bigger bonuses, but such schemes don’t instill confidence in workers, and unless workers think they will be paid more in the future than they are now, they aren’t going to spend as freely, behavior that’s central to the success of Abenomics.

In the Kyodo survey 71 percent of businesses polled believe they will see growth in 2014, but if that growth isn’t translated into higher salaries, the game is off. Moreover, the good performance of the economy in 2013 was misleading. As web magazine Diamond Online points out, it was a minority of well-to-do Japanese who benefited from the stock market boom in the past year. Also, because people have anticipated the consumption tax hike next year, they rushed to buy houses. These two factors boost numbers, at least temporarily, but they don’t solve the underlying problem of deflation and lack of consumer sentiment in the population at large.

Much was made of the big profits enjoyed by large companies this year, but they represent a fairly small portion of the Japanese business community, only 0.3 percent of all registered companies. They made money through exports, meaning they benefited from the higher dollar. That’s all. Diamond says that 70 percent of the Japanese workforce is employed by small or medium-sized companies, who depend mainly on domestic consumption.

Diamond surveyed 200 workers about their winter bonuses. Seventy-eight said they received no bonus at all, while 98 said their bonus was less than ¥500,000. Only 38 replied that their bonus was larger than last year’s, while 40 said it was less. The remainder said there was no change. This contrasts greatly with the widely reported news that the average winter bonus of an employee of a large company was ¥806,000.

More significantly, when Diamond asked the people who did receive a bonus what they used it for, 61 percent said it went into their savings, while 24 percent said it would go for “necessary expenses” and 19 percent used it to help pay off loans. In other words, only 6 percent, at most, bought something with it.

The Mizuho Research Institute found that the average household, which earns ¥4 million-¥5 million a year, will spend ¥78,869 more in taxes in 2014 thanks to the consumption tax increase. The Cocomane website, which helps consumers save money with tips on reducing expenditures, did its own survey of 1,127 people, 80 percent of whom said they “economize” on a regular basis. Why are they always looking to save money? The number one reason is to “prepare” for future expenditures. The second most common reason was “loss of income,” and the third reason “not enough money saved.” As to the question “How do you save money?” the most frequent answer was the simplest: Just try not to spend it, followed by “not eating out” and “cutting back on utilities.”

But the most interesting responses were in relation to the consumption tax hike. Fifty-four percent of respondents said they have not made nor do they intend to make any “big purchases” before the increase goes into effect, and 62 percent of the people who are making big purchases say it has nothing to do with the increase. Essentially, most consumers either aren’t changing their already careful consumption habits in face of the tax increase, or they will try to spend less. Almost no one expects to spend more.

Government wondering how to tap burgeoning ebook market

Saturday, October 12th, 2013

No waiting

No waiting

It’s official. The consumption tax goes up to 8 percent in April, and the government is anxious to plug any loopholes. The most bothersome one is for ebooks. Though domestically sold ebooks, meaning those distributed by Japanese vendors from physical addresses in Japan, are already taxed, those sold from overseas are not, and the tax bureau is wondering how to correct this problem, especially now that the price gap between an ebook purchased from a foreign-based agent and one purchased from a Japan-based seller will widen, thus setting up a disadvantage for the latter. Market research company Daiwa Soken reports that in 2012 the government missed out on ¥24.7 billion worth of tax revenues from the purchase of ebooks from abroad.

Legally, sales transactions that occur outside of Japan are not subject to consumption tax, and the place of the transaction is determined by the address of the seller. So if you go to Amazon.co.jp and look at various books, you’ll notice that those which are sold by Amazon Japan have consumption tax included in the price, while ebooks sold by Amazon Services International do not. What the government wants to do is change the law so that the place of the sales transaction is not the place of sale but rather the place of usage, a tactic that some American local governments have tried with regard to sales tax. But sales taxes are paid at the retail stage, while consumption taxes are incurred at every step of distribution, so a Japanese importer adds the tax after the item arrives in Japan.

If a customer in Japan buys the book directly from overseas, no tax is imposed, but when the law is changed customs could add it because the imposition location is the user’s address, not the seller’s. However, since ebooks, as well as music tracks and software, tend to be purchased over the net it’s more difficult to monitor, if not downright impossible.

According to Tokyo Shimbun, the Finance Ministry’s plan is to strike deals with tax agencies abroad so that the consumption tax is added on when sales are made. Overseas sales companies who do business in Japan would have to register with the Japanese tax bureau. For large-scale companies with widespread presence in Japan and sales units overseas, like Amazon and Rakuten, which in 2011 bought the Canadian ebook seller Kobo, that shouldn’t be a problem, but there are dozens if not hundreds of smaller content vendors who will fall through the cracks.

Already, some Japanese language ebook sellers and other net vendors have set up operations overseas to exploit this loophole, thus causing concern for domestic companies like Yahoo Japan, whose president compared such competition to a boxing match in which Japanese companies “have to fight opponents who are three weight classes above them.” Eight percent can make a big difference, especially since Japanese ebooks tend to be priced high anyway compared to ebooks in other countries.

In that regard, buyers of non-Japanese language books have an even greater advantage in Japan, since Japanese publishers still enjoy government-sanctioned fixed prices for all first-sale books and magazines, regardless of when they were printed. Japanese bookstores cannot set their own prices and industry distribution rules discourage remainders. With the rising popularity of ebooks in the West — 20 percent of all books now sold in the U.S. are electronic as opposed to 8 percent in Japan — print books have actually benefited since people can seek out remainders and used books through Internet sales agents, and usually they purchase them for less money than an ebook, even with shipping included. That’s not the case in Japan, except for used books. But if Japanese ebook sellers set up agencies abroad they can corner the market.

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