Archive for the ‘Family matters’ Category

Retiring boomers make their last stand on the real estate market

Monday, February 9th, 2015

Onward and upward: Diorama showing high-rise condos under construction on Tokyo's waterfront

Onward and upward: Diorama showing high-rise condos under construction on Tokyo’s waterfront

Following the 2011 Eastern Japan Earthquake, sales of high-rise condominiums in Tokyo saw a drop that reflected anxiety over living so far off the ground. Though no high-rises were damaged in the temblor (if anything, the disaster showed how well they’d been built to withstand earthquakes), matters such as stopped elevators and the possibility of losing water or other utilities even temporarily were made apparent to tower dwellers. More significantly, elderly people who lived high up realized how difficult it would be to evacuate in the case of a quake hitting the city more directly.

The sales decline was short-lived. High-rise condos, or “tower mansions,” are as popular as ever right now, and according to a recent article in Shukan Asahi, especially popular among retired and soon-to-be-retired people.

With the memory of the quake receding and developers promoting even safer high-rises, the aging baby boom generation is looking at the issue from a practical standpoint. The article profiles a 60-year-old woman named Midori Takahashi who bought her condo four years ago in Koto Ward on the Tokyo waterfront, in a new high-rise 10 minutes by foot from Kiyosumi Shirakawa Station on the Hanzomon Metro line. She and her 57-year-old husband bought the property after assessing the situation of her own parents, who lived in Shizuoka City. When her father retired, he bought a house in the countryside, near a river with a beautiful view, since he wanted to spend the rest of his life surrounded by nature. But as his health deteriorated he found it difficult to make regular visits to a hospital, so he moved back to the city.

Takahashi and her 57-year-old husband are childless. They have their own health concerns, and when both were forced to retire early they sold their Tokyo home and bought an ekichika (close to station) high-rise condo, also in Tokyo. They are close to hospitals and retail outlets, and with two train lines within easy walking distance they can get anywhere without having to drive. Moreover, they’ve found that most of the people in their building are the same age, and have thus joined a new community with relative ease.

CONTINUE READING about the changing real estate market for boomers →

Where’s the milk? School lunches no longer sacred cows

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Screen shot of February lunch menus for an elementary school in Gifu Prefecture

The February lunch menu for an elementary school in Gifu Prefecture

Last Saturday was the start of Gakko Kyushoku Shukan (School Lunch Week), an annual celebration of the meals that public elementary and junior high school students in Japan enjoy every day by force of law.

School lunches have been a point of pride for Japan’s education institutions, a means of integrating lifelong health maintenance into the standard curriculum. On another level, mandatory school lunches, as the late writer Kuniko Mukoda once famously pointed out, was the basis for the widespread idea that all Japanese belonged to the “middle class.”

Several years ago, the government said it wanted to reinforce “food education,” though it hardly seems necessary since the school lunch program already does that, and very effectively. According to law, all public school children below high school must buy lunch, and those who cannot afford it receive subsidies from the authorities. Each school will have its own nutritionist to make sure the children receive properly balanced meals. In terms of cost, the ingredients for the meals will be paid for by the students, meaning their parents, while labor, maintenance and other related expenses are taken care of by local governments with help from the central government.

This latter element has lately been challenged as more local governments look for ways to cut their budgets. Last summer, Sanjo, a city in Niigata Prefecture, “experimentally” stopped serving milk with lunches at 30 public schools. The ostensible reason, according to the mayor, was that parents complained that milk doesn’t fit in with the Japanese cuisine the schools served.

CONTINUE READING about school lunches →

Consumer stimulus is not the same as welfare, though the purpose is the same

Monday, December 29th, 2014

Screen shot from Toyonaka, Osaka Prefecture, city office home page informing residents that the deadline for the one-time welfare handout is Jan. 5.

Screen grab from Toyonaka, Osaka Prefecture, city office home page informing residents that the deadline for the one-time welfare handout is Jan. 5.

Last weekend the cabinet of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe reemerged from its victory lap to approve an economic stimulus package worth ¥3.5 trillion whose purpose is to help rural areas cope with inflation brought on by last April’s consumption tax hike, not to mention the more recent drop in the yen’s value, which has made imported goods more expensive. Some of the money will go to local infrastructure projects, mainly in the area of disaster prevention, and a little less will go directly to consumers and companies.

This handout, however, shouldn’t be confused with the one that the government implemented last summer for poor people, though there will be overlap. In fact, some local governments, which administer the one-time welfare handouts (rinji kyufukin), are still looking for eligible people since many residents who aren’t on their welfare roles nevertheless are qualified to receive the money. So far, about 24 million have received the handout.

The only real difference between the welfare handout and the stimulus handout is the ostensible purpose: the former was designed to help low income people adjust to the CT hike, while the latter is a means of getting more money into the distribution system, but in the end the government wants the same thing: higher consumption, which is why the stimulus handout will likely be in the form of a coupon that can only be spent on goods and services. That isn’t necessary with low income people, who by necessity spend everything they get on goods and services.

CONTINUE READING about consumer stimulus →

Attitudes about money continue to affect marriage prospects

Monday, December 1st, 2014

Head first: Newly married couple having their picture taken at a park in Makuhari

Head first: Newly married couple having their picture taken at a park in Makuhari

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has characterized the upcoming general election as a referendum for his fiscal policies, popularly known as “Abenomics,” so it’s not surprising that the opposition has focused on those policies as a means of discrediting his administration.

The Democratic Party of Japan’s chief cabinet secretary, Yukio Edano, recently gave a public speech from a sound truck in Yamagata City, and talked mainly about the effect that Abenomics has had on employment. Abe brags about creating new jobs with his policy, but Edano contends that these jobs are not the kind that allow young people to “get married and start families,” since they are mostly temporary or contract work (haken) that doesn’t guarantee a stable future. “At the very least, we have to increase the number of jobs that guarantee stability, otherwise we can’t call it an employment policy,” he said.

Edano has a point, though he may not realize how sharp it actually is. Last year, the marriage information company O-Net, which is part of the Rakuten Group, conducted a survey of single men and women in the Tokyo metropolitan area between the ages of 25 and 39 to find out their prospects for marriage. When asked why they were not married, the most common answer (multiple responses were allowed) for both genders was that they “don’t have a chance to meet people of the opposite sex.”

CONTINUE READING about marriage proposal criteria

Are Japan’s public school teachers paid too much?

Monday, November 17th, 2014

Japanese teachers make more money than the world average, but they also work many more hours. (Photo by ajari CC by 2.0

Japanese teachers make more money than the world average, but they also work many more hours. (Photo by ajari CC by 2.0)

Last month the Ministry of Finance presented a policy recommendation based on studies made by an advisory group. Such recommendations are fairly common, but this one caught more than the usual amount of attention because of where it was directed.

The ministry thinks that the maximum class size for first year elementary school students should be increased from 35 to 40. In purely economic terms, such a change would result in a reduction of as many as 4,000 teachers, which would translate as ¥8.6 billion in savings for the central government alone. However, the ministry’s explanation for why the change should be implemented was not made in fiscal terms. It was made in educational terms.

Until the Democratic Party of Japan became the ruling party, maximum class size was 40, and the DPJ changed it to 35 in order to address the bullying problem. But the finance ministry says that bullying incidents have increased slightly since class sizes were reduced, so obviously it has had no effect.

CONTINUE READING about education budgets

The case for a higher consumption tax

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

Big needs: Should daily necessities by exempt from the consumption tax?

Big needs: Should daily necessities by exempt from the consumption tax?

Right now the government is fretting over whether or not to raise the consumption tax to its planned level of 10 percent in October of next year. For a while it seemed like a sure thing, but the drop in demand that accompanied the most recent hike to 8 percent in April, coupled with less inflation than the administration and the Bank of Japan had hoped for, has put the plan into doubt. The fear is that another boost in the tax will send the economy into a recessionary tailspin.

Akira Sugawara, a high school teacher who has published an economics primer for businessmen, recently wrote a simple, easy-to-understand polemic in favor of raising the tax for the online version of the business magazine Toyo Keizai. In line with his mission to explain economic principles to people who don’t have a strong grasp of basics, Sugawara starts out by explaining what the consumption tax is supposed to do, rather than what it is actually doing.

Originally, the purpose of the tax was to bolster social security in the face of a rapidly aging society, and though so far revenues from the tax have been used to pay off Japan’s massive debt, Sugawara still thinks social security should be prioritized when discussing the consumption tax.

CONTINUE READING about higher consumption tax →

Mail order scofflaws are the exception that proves the rule

Monday, September 15th, 2014

The gods know if you're honest: An unmanned farm stand in Inzai

The gods know if you’re honest: An unmanned farm stand in Inzai

A recent article in the Asahi Shimbun described a small cross section of consumers who take advantage of a peculiar aspect of mail-order sales in Japan. Some small- and medium-sized sales agents who do their business over the Internet have problems with customers who don’t pay. In most cases, Internet and mail order sales are done on a prepaid basis: The buyer either provides credit/debit card information or makes a bank/post office money transfer prior to the item being shipped. But a few work on what can best be described as the honor system. They send the item to the buyer with a bill that the buyer pays after receiving the item. Sometimes the bill has a handling fee attached and sometimes it doesn’t.

According to the Asahi article, some people don’t pay up, and perhaps never intended to. A non-profit organization called the Mail Order Unpaid Protection Network (MOUPN), which monitors such scofflaws, estimates that mail-order sales companies lose about ¥20 billion a year to such people.

Asahi, in fact, found one, though he seems reluctant to admit it. In the article, a reporter visits an unnamed man “in his 50s living in an apartment in Tokyo.” The man receives an order of green tea by courier, but the reporter notes that the name on the package is that of a woman. “I made the order on behalf of a friend,” the man explains. When asked why he didn’t use his real name, the man doesn’t answer. Other packages arrive addressed to different women. When asked what’s in one of them the man shrugs and says, “Maybe food?” He insists that he will pay for it but usually “just forgets.”

CONTINUE READING about abuse of Japan's honor system

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