Archive for the ‘Banking & Investment’ Category

What the government doesn’t pay in pensions it will have to make up for with welfare

Monday, July 7th, 2014

One of the biggest fiscal issues — if not the biggest fiscal issue — facing the government is the expected steep increase in the number of seniors who will require welfare benefits after retirement. Everyone assumes that the various national pension systems by themselves are not enough to sustain a minimum standard of living for the people who receive them, and so they will need additional income, either in terms of savings, returns from investments or wages.

Back to work?

Back to work?

In a recent survey conducted by the prime minister’s office and whose target respondents were people between the ages of 35 and 64, nearly 70 percent said that they are not now, nor do they think they will be, financially prepared for retirement. The government, anticipating this reality, several years ago passed a law to ensure that people who wish to work after their designated retirement age will be able to do so, though, as is often the case with socially-minded legislation, there is no compulsion toward employers to make this happen or any penalties if they don’t. It’s up to the employee and the employer working together.

In any case, when asked if they want to work after “retirement,” 31.4 percent of the respondents said they would after the age of 65, and 20.9 percent said they would want to do so after the age of 70. That means more than 52 percent want to work after the age of 60, which is still the standard retirement age at most companies. When asked why they want to work, 77 percent said “to make a living.”

As far as people who are trying to save money for their old age, only 1.6 percent admitted to having “more than enough,” with 21.7 percent saying they have saved or expect to have saved “the minimum necessary.” Of those who answered that they haven’t saved enough, half admit that their savings is “almost nothing,” with 74 percent in the 35-39 age bracket saying their savings is “insufficient,” which probably means nothing so far.

But perception of what they need is also an important consideration. In a survey conducted in June of 2013, the Ministry of Internal Affairs found that the average household whose head is between 60 and 69 spent ¥259,695 a month. This amount dropped to ¥196,500 for households whose head was over 70. According to another survey conducted by the Central Council for Financial Services Information, respondents who are currently working believe, on average, that a retired person needs ¥260,000 a month to live off of.

The government organ, Japan Pension Service, says that the monthly pension income of a retired “model household” is ¥230,000 a month, which comes down to ¥100,000 for a husband who was enrolled in the company sponsored koseinenkin system, ¥65,000 for the same husband’s basic pension (kiso nenkin), and his wife’s own basic pension of ¥65,000. The model assumes that the husband and his employer paid into both pension systems for a full 40 years, and since the dependent wife, as the spouse of a full-time regular employee, is categorized as a “number 3″ national pension subscriber, she is assumed to have paid her fair share, even though, in reality, she paid nothing.

This model household, however, represents a minority. Many other households have heads who are non-regular workers or who were not consistent in terms of payment schedules over the years. And there are other factors that can reduce what a household can expect. The JPS survey found in July 2013 that the average retired household of a former regular employee who paid into the koseinenkin system was ¥215,780. The monthly benefit for people who paid into the basic pension system for a full forty years is now ¥65,541 a month, but the average payout is ¥49,947. Households whose heads are between 60 and 69 said on average that their pension income was 44,000 less than what they needed.

This latter point is important because payments for the basic pension don’t start until age 65 for both spouses, so even for a model household, that means if the breadwinner retires at 60, their pension income is only ¥100,000 for five years. That means they would need another ¥160,000 to reach the level that most people now think you need when you retire. So for those five years, the couple will be short about ¥9 million in total.

In addition, the government is trying to extend the starting age for koseinenkin payments. Right now it starts at 61, but eventually the government wants it to start at 65, or even later, so that limit will rise gradually in the future, further reducing the pension amounts that people receive if they retire at 60. That’s why the government is trying to encourage employers to retain employees even after their mandatory retirement age. According to Asahi Shimbun, employees who are retained after retirement are essentially let go and then rehired at one-fourth to one-third their former salaries. There is nothing in the new law that guarantees a minimum wage for these workers.

And with boomer retirement increasing through to the middle of the next decade, it’s assumed that senior welfare rolls will just keep increasing as well. In 2011, 46.4 percent of the 2 million people on welfare were over 65. The majority of these people are seniors who only receive basic pensions and have no other income or property. The only bright spot is that many boomers already own their homes, so at least they won’t end up on the streets.

Diamonds are suddenly everybody’s best friend

Saturday, May 31st, 2014

Several years ago the term “urban mining” took off. It referred to the discovery of precious metals that were “buried” in people’s homes in the form of personal possessions like jewelry and home electronics that they weren’t using. A lot of cell phones, for instance, use gold and other valuable materials in their circuits, and when the price of these substances was high, brokers would pay premium prices for them, no matter where they came from or what form they were in.

Komehyo outlet in Ginza, Tokyo

Komehyo outlet in Ginza, Tokyo

At the time, gems were not coveted so much, but that’s changed. Right now, the price of diamonds on the world market is about 30 percent higher than it was a year ago, according to a recent article in Chunichi Shimbun, thanks to a healthier world economy. Consequently, well-to-do people in Asia, North America and the Middle East are craving diamonds, and foreign buyers, particularly from the U.S., China, India and Dubai, are flocking to Japan because they think there are a lot of the rocks here “sleeping” in people’s closets and vanity cases.

The reason is simple. During the bubble period of the late ’80s, when the value of various assets was higher than it probably should have been, people with even a little money bought a lot of jewelry that they don’t wear any more. Many of these people probably have forgotten they even have diamonds.

Komehyo, the Nagoya-based retailer that specializes in recycling high-end merchandise such as designer accessories and expensive jewelry, is spearheading the drive to get Japanese people to dig into their tansu (wardrobes). As one of the company’s store managers told Chunichi, another reason foreign buyers are descending on Japan is that the diamonds are already cut, and used cut diamonds tend to be cheaper than new ones, though there really isn’t any difference in quality. Komehyo is hoping to sell used diamonds in bulk and is offering premium prices to anyone who wants to unload theirs. The chain has launched a Diamond Purchase Fair at all its 20 outlets throughout Japan.

In order to get a handle on the market, Komehyo conducted a survey among men and women over the age of 20. They found that, on average, respondents have each spent about ¥780,000 on “jewelry, watches, bags and brand goods” during their life so far.

Several years ago Tanaka Kikinzoku Kogyo, a dealer in gold and other precious metals, carried out its own survey and found that 80 percent of female respondents have jewelry they don’t wear any more, either because they no longer like the design, or lost one earring or just forgot about it. The company calculates that the average woman in this group has ¥40,000 worth of jewelry they never wear. Tanaka was interested in gold, however,

Based on its own findings, Komehyo estimates the average person possesses about ¥160,000 yen’s worth of jewelry and other valuables that they don’t use any more, which means there could be as much as ¥15 trillion worth of diamonds in people’s homes.

College students’ savings habits indicate anxiety about the future

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

Screen shot of website offering financial advice to college students

Screen shot of website offering financial advice to college students

Asahi Shimbun recently reported that more and more university students are trying to save money even before they graduate and get a job. The article conjectures that young people are anxious about the future and uncertain about their job prospects so they think they have to be financially prepared.

One 19-year-old Keio University sophomore, who commutes to school from his parents’ home in Tokyo, managed to save ¥1.8 million over the course of a year. He works part-time 3 or 4 days a week in an office, sometimes until midnight, and receives ¥250,000 a month, which is actually quite good for part-time work at that age. He saves half his pay, and the rest goes to his ¥1 million a year tuition, which he pays himself. He spends about ¥30,000 a month on food, ¥10,000 on “music activities” (he’s in a band), ¥10,000 on clothing (“I buy cheap clothes”) and “only” ¥10,000 a month for his phone (because he uses Line). His sole major outside expense was a snowboarding excursion last winter that cost him ¥100,000.

CONTINUE READING about college students' savings habits →

Regional bank hits on novel way to attract business

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

Banner advertising housing loans outside branch of Keiyo Bank in Inzai

Banner advertising housing loans outside branch of Keiyo Bank in Inzai

Lottery winners who hit the jackpot are always good news stories, but the anonymous lucky individual who was the subject of reports in all major media on Feb. 3 represented a different angle on the topic. Instead of being announced by the authorities who administer the Year-end Jumbo Takarakuji lottery, the ¥700 million prize was publicized by a regional financial institution, Chiba Prefecture’s Keiyo Bank. That’s because the winner of the jackpot didn’t actually have the winning ticket in his or her possession. The bank was holding it for safe keeping.

With interests rates on time deposits being so low for so long, banks, especially smaller regional ones, have a tough time convincing people to become customers and usually resort to special premiums or deals. Keiyo’s is to offer lottery tickets as incentives to open savings accounts. For every one million yen deposited in a three-year teiki yokin (time deposit account), the depositor receives five lottery tickets per year for various drawings. Keiyo, however, only supplies the customer with the number of the ticket, not the ticket itself, which it holds on to. When the drawing is carried out the customer checks the number against the winners and if there’s a match the customer contacts the bank, which then gives the customer the ticket for him or her to cash in.

In this most recent case, the drawing was conducted in early January and the bank, knowing that one of its customers had won, waited for the customer to call. The person didn’t.   After a month, the bank finally called the individual with the happy news.

What’s most interesting about the story is that it isn’t the first time a Keiyo customer has hit it big. The bank has been offering the lottery incentive since March 2007, and in the intervening years there have been 34 ¥1 million winners, two ¥5 million winners and one ¥100 million winner. These numbers give the impression that Keiyo customers have a higher probability of winning, but according to a lottery expert interviewed by Tokyo Shimbun it’s difficult to figure the odds since the bank has never released the total number of tickets it has bought for customers over the years, but likely it isn’t that much because Keiyo is, after all, a regional bank with a limited reach.

As a reference, interest on a three-year time deposit is 0.03 percent, which means for the first year of a ¥1 million account the customer earns ¥300. That amount would buy one ¥300 lottery ticket before the government deducts its 20.315 percent tax on interest.

Side note: In December we wrote about the Post Office lottery for New Years cards. In case you still have them lying around and didn’t check the winning numbers here they are: If the last five digits on any of the cards you received are, in order, 9-7-0-8-5 then you win ¥10,000. If the last four digits are 2-3-4-4, you win a prize of some sort of regional product. And if the last two digits are either 7-2 or 7-4, you win a sheet of postage stamps. You have until six months after the Jan. 22 announcement date to claim your prizes.

When will they learn: Old folks still falling for swindlers

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

Bank flyer from Chiba police warning about telephone swindlers.

Bank flyer from Chiba police warning about telephone swindlers.

On Jan. 23, the Chiba prefectural police announced that in 2013 there 724 reported cases of telephone swindling targeting older people, a phenomenon that is still referred to as ore-ore sagi (literally, “it’s me, it’s me” swindles) though the modus operandi of the perpetrators have changed since it first became topical some years ago.

Originally, swindlers pretended to be members of the intended victim’s family and feigned some sort of trouble that required large sums of money to rectify, in which case the target was instructed to transfer the money to a specific bank account. Some media also call this crime furikomi sagi (bank transfer swindling).

Despite lots of publicity regarding this type of crime, swindlers are getting bolder. In 90 percent of the cases reported in Chiba, the swindler or an agent went to the home of the victim and either picked up the cash directly or, even more amazingly, picked up the victim’s ATM card and then withdrew the money himself.

Obviously, these persons weren’t impersonating a relative, which is why the media have yet to come up with a new memorable term. In many cases the swindler pretends to be a government official offering a tax refund or something similar and then acquires the card to carry out the transaction.

In others the swindler pretends to be a securities person with a can’t-miss deal that will make the person lots of money, and while this an old scam, what’s new about it is that the scammer actually shows up to collect the cash for the investment in person. Another new wrinkle in the swindle is using convenience store ATMs, since banks have become wise to the fraud and have installed security cameras and other devices to catch swindlers in the act.

Though the number of cases hasn’t increased appreciably the amount of money swindled has: ¥460 million, a new record for Chiba. That averages out to about ¥3.2 million per successful swindle. In 78 cases, the amount swindled was over ¥10 million. Nationwide the trend is the same.

As of the end of October the amounts swindled totalled ¥38.3 billion and analysts predicted the damage might go as high as ¥42 billion for the year. The total amount in 2012 was ¥38 billion. On the relative plus side Chiba police made 129 arrests of swindlers.

The police are understandably frustrated by the fact that their PR efforts have’t really had any effect, and have told the elderly public just to “not answer the phone,” which is possible to do since everyone has voice mail, even old folks. They advise to listen to the messages and then decide in a cool manner whether or not the caller is legitimate, which sounds like sensible advice, but then avoiding such scams in the past didn’t sound that difficult either, but apparently it was.

For customers of Japan’s biggest bank, it’s about to become harder to avoid fees

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

Mickey Mouse club: passbook and Direct card for MUFG account holders

Mickey Mouse club: passbook and Direct card for MUFG account holders

Tokyo Mitsubishi UFJ Bank (MUFG) is Japan’s largest bank in terms of number of branches, but there are none within the borders of the city where we live, which is only an hour by train from Nihonbashi, Tokyo. Since all of our freelance work is paid through the MUFG account we set up in the Aoyama branch years ago, this could be a problem, but MUFG offers online banking services and there are plenty of convenience stores with ATMs within walking distance of our apartment in case we need cash.

But that’s going to change on Dec. 20, when MUFG’s new ATM policy goes into effect. For people who live near a branch of the bank, the changes are a good thing. At present, account holders can withdraw money from MUFG ATMs without having to pay a handling fee if they do so between 8:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. on weekdays. At all other times they have to pay an extra ¥105. Starting December 20, the time for free withdrawals is extended to 9 p.m., and that includes weekends and holidays, which will also be free from now on. The ¥105 fee is still in effect from 9 p.m. to 8:45 a.m.

Things are different, however, for convenience store ATMs. Presently, account holders for certain banks can use CS ATMs for free during the day on weekdays. For MUFG customers it’s the same as it is for bank AMTs — no fee between 8:45 a.m. and 6 p.m. But starting December 20, a ¥105 fee will be charged for withdrawals from CS ATMs between 8:45 and 6, and a ¥210 fee for withdrawals at other hours. So that means we can’t avoid paying a fee if we need cash quickly.

But there are ways to circumvent the fees if you’re an MUFG customer, it’s just that they’re not that easy to understand, so we’ll try to make it simple.

In principle, customers who have accounts called Super Futsu Yokin (Main Bank Plus) can withdraw cash from ATMs for free, though it depends on your “stage” and the type of ATM.

White stage: At the end of the month, if your account balance is at least ¥100,000 you can withdraw cash from an MUFG bank ATM for free any time, even in the middle of the night. This also applies to account holders who have an MUFG-issued credit card, in which case a minimum balance is not required. This no-fee condition is effective from the 20th of the following month until the 19th of the month after that.

Silver stage: At the end of the month, if your account balance is at least ¥300,000, or if you receive your salary in your account and your salary is at least ¥100,000 a month, then you can withdraw cash from bank ATMs anytime for free and up to three times during the following month from CS ATMs for free any time. Again, the month is counted as starting from the next 20th to the following 19th. Note that “salary” has to be transferred as such (kyūryō) and printed in your passbook.

Platinum stage: At the end of the month, if your account balance is at least ¥5 million, or if you have taken out a housing loan with MUFG and the balance is more than ¥5 million, there are no fees anywhere for anything. You can also make up to three money transfers (usually ¥315) in a month’s time for free.

One more catch: To qualify for any of these deals you have to register your account for MUFG Direct, which is MUFG’s internet banking service. Good luck.

Aging boomers may prove to be just as tight with savings

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

Praying is free (but the incense will cost you)

Praying is free (but the incense will cost you)

The media has been all over the new figures related to seniors that were released by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications to coincide with Respect for the Aged Day. To recap, the number of Japanese people over 65 increased by 1.12 million from the previous year, which marks a 0.95 percent rise.

The big news is that this brings the total number of seniors to about 32 million, or one-fourth of the entire population. This was expected since the huge cohort of baby boomers — which in Japan refers only to people born during a brief period in the late 1940s — is now passing the 65-year mark, and the projection is that seniors will make up a third of the population by 2035. To break down these portions even further, 18 percent of the population is over 70, 12 percent over 75 and 7 percent over 80.

What hasn’t been discussed as widely is the economic ramifications of these developments. In 2012 there were 5.95 million people over 65 who were still in the work force, or 9.5 percent of all workers over the age of 15. The average amount of savings — whether bank accounts, annuities or securities — of households with more than one person where the householder is at least 65 is ¥22.57 million. The average savings of all households is ¥16.64 million. Also, 16 percent of over-65 households have savings of more than ¥40 million, while only 10 percent of all households have saved that much.

The hope has been that once they retire boomers will spend their savings more readily than did previous generations, but so far that doesn’t seem to be the case. The ministry’s statistics indicate that more money is being spent by seniors who are still working. Those who aren’t working, meaning they are on fixed incomes provided by government or company pensions, are spending much less.

In either case, working or not, the seniors are not touching their savings. They are only spending their income. In the parlance of economists, they are asset rich but cash poor. The average income of an over-65 household is ¥2.96 million (that of an average household in general is ¥5.8 million), but the median income of an over-65 household is ¥2.29 million, meaning the majority of these households are within the ¥1 to ¥3 million income range, and that’s what they are living on.

A Cabinet Office survey conducted in 2011 asked seniors what the purpose of their savings was. About 62 percent said it was for sudden illnesses and future care and 20 percent said it was for “maintaining existence” in case of an unexpected financial problem. Only 5 percent said they would spend it on leisure, and a mere 1.6 percent wanted to use it for travel. It should be noted that 90 percent of these respondents owned their own homes or did not pay rent, so housing, at least, was not a primary concern. However, given the cost of private nursing homes, which charge upwards of ¥20 million just to move in, it’s perfectly reasonable to think that seniors believe they have to save for those final years. Until that sort of anxiety is addressed, it will always be difficult to get seniors to part with their savings.

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