Today’s J-blip: Yoshitomo Nara for No Nukes

June 29th, 2012 by Blair Reedy

Last Friday, depending on whose estimates you believe, as many as 40,000 protestors gathered in Tokyo to send a message to Japanese Prime Minister Noda over the government’s decision to restart two nuclear reactors at the Oi power plant. Their rally cry? Simple and to the point. “No Nukes!” Later today, protest organizers hope to have over 100,000 protestors gather to make sure the message is reiterated, loud and clear.

And they’ve got some help. Popular contemporary artist Yoshitomo Nara has been outspoken against the use of nuclear energy for many years and his painting of a young girl carrying a No Nukes sign has become a major icon in the movement. Last week he tweeted (@michinara3) that he wouldn’t mind if people borrowed his 1998 book “Slash with a Knife” from a library and photocopied his “NO NUKES girl” to use for protest, as long as they didn’t plan to profit from it. You can download a high-resolution version at A3 size here.

 

Tonight’s protest is 6-8 p.m. in front of the Prime Minister’s office in Nagatacho. More information is available in Japanese at Metropolitan Coalition Against Nukes.

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3 Responses

  1. Poster was all over the demos last week and tonight. Organisers were counting people as they exited the subways last week and gave up at 30,000. Attendance tonight (6/29) was easily double or more. Cops lost control of the streets, formed a final line in front of the 官邸.

    BTW, download link seems to be to an unrelated story.

  2. Regarding the high-res, A3-size version of Nara Yoshitomo’s print mentioned at the end of this story — the link does not work (it goes to a JT story about B-kyu gourmet).

  3. Thanks for spotting the link error. It’s fixed now. Here’s a JT story about last night’s demo: http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/nn20120630a1.html

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