Posts Tagged ‘underwear’

Fundoshi: the innerwear sanctum of Cool Biz

Friday, June 21st, 2013

Despite the energy-conserving Cool Biz campaign — inaugurated in 2005 by former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi — becoming a household word, according to a recent poll by The Suit Company 28.8% of women thought Cool Biz casual dress was still inappropriate at work.

The new trad fundoshi

The new trad fundoshi

What’s a well-intentioned man to do? Well, how about taking the Cool Biz under your suit?

This past March innerwear maker Wacoal launched a new underwear line for men called Fundoshi NEXT (ふんどしNEXT). Fundoshi is as traditional as you can get with underwear in Japan. Before Western briefs arrived, they were the undergarment of choice. In public, they are a common sight at traditional festivals, and sumo wrestlers wear a more elaborate version. While there are several types of fundoshi, they all involve a strap and piece of cloth material. Looking a bit like a fat thong, the fundoshi exposes a large part of the buttocks.

Wacoal’s spin on this tradition, which echoes the recent rage for suteteko, adopts the original fundoshi’s breathability and sense of openness, while utilizing a modern design and quick-drying material. Combining the best of old and new, Wacoal is offering a revealing remedy to the summer heat.

This fundoshi revival is also spreading to woman’s underwear.  FFsee recently launched an online fundoshi shop playfully called Aifun (love + fundoshi) aimed at women. With the motto of “sayonara sutoresu” (goodbye stress), they hope to give customers a more comfortable fit than typical panties. FFsee says that the less constricting fundoshi will decrease swelling and improve skin quality.

A Japanese saying says, “to know the new, look to the old” (古きを尋ね新しきを知る). Call it old school, but these risque retro looks could leave you smiling cheek-to-cheek.

Today’s J-blip: gas-neutralizing underwear

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

Smell? What smell?

Find yourself cutting the cheese in the office often? With Deoest, a line of deodorizing textiles manufactured by Japanese company Seiren, you no longer have to sit red-faced at your desk.

While odor-eliminating products such as T-shirts, socks and bedding have been available since 2008, the one that’s really been raising eyebrows is underwear that absorbs stink. Originally developed for people with irritable bowel problems by Professor Hiroki Ohge of Hiroshima University Hospital, the underwear has apparently found a market among ordinary businessmen. Ceramic material, which contains metal ions, is the key player in containing the odor. Deoest underwear retails at ¥3,200 for men and ¥2,980 for women and can be purchased from Inodore.

News of this product mushroomed on the web this week, thanks to RocketNews24‘s translation of Mainichi Online and a subsequent post on The Huffington Post, but is it truly BIG in JAPAN? Mainichi reported that sales of the whole 22-item deodorizing series has reached 30,000, but we’re skeptical whether its reached boom proportions. Still, as potential stocking stuffer for that special-smelling someone, this one could be a winner.

Today’s J-blip: Suteteko

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

In the hot and sticky Japanese summer months, staying cool can be a challenge. However, a resurgence in traditional suteteko (say stet-eh-ko) is making it a little bit easier. Fear not — these aren’t your grandpa’s long johns! Contemporary sutekeko are pants made of light-weight, breathable material and fall just below (or above) the knee. Once a boutique item (that we spotted a year ago), they are now available from major retailers like Uniqlo as well as dedicated shops. Great for lounging around the house, walking your dog or even on a first date if you dare . . . If it doesn’t go well, at least you’ll have the peace of mind knowing it wasn’t because of your sweaty legs.

We’ve pinned a sampling of some of the huge variety of patterns and colors. Follow this and Japan Pulse’s other boards on Pinterest.

With steteco and haramaki, old men’s underwear is young again

Friday, February 25th, 2011

A selection of steteco from Steteco.com

Men’s underwear is going retro in Japan, with steteco leading the pack. Steteco are “long trunks” that date back to tight trousers worn in Japan as early as the 14th century. The knee-length pants loosened up along the way and were just the thing to wear under hakama or kimono in the Meiji Era, and they made a comeback with the mass production of gauzy crepe fabric in the 50s. By the 1970s, blue jeans and the “new traditional” look had relegated the storied drawers to the top drawers of aging dads. But now, as old-man cute makes a global fashion comeback, the old briefs are young again.

In 2008, Steteco.com, a sub-brand of an intimate apparel maker called as, not only started making a youthful version of them, they called for nothing less than a world-wide steteco revival. “The first time I wore them under a suit, I loved how comfortable and absorbent they were, and how nice it was to come home, take off the suit, and just relax in them,” the head of the “Tokyo Labo” says on their site. “We decided to show the world how great life can be with steteco.”

Their vision has been catching on. In addition to Japanese fashion brands like Uniqlo and United Arrows, big international names are also bringing out their own versions. Hanes is about to put out a line in March, calling them “Neoteco.” Some have loud Hawaiian prints while others stick to a more traditional palette of sober stripes and plaids. The colors and  length recall surfers’ board shorts, but the fabrics are lighter and the silhouette is a bit slimmer. Levi’s made some, now apparently out of stock, to look like stone-washed jeans in blue and black. Company catalogs show both men and women wearing the basic models, and there are also low-rise women’s versions with lace trim.

Haramaki briefs from Wacaol's Lunch

Not so into the loose and breezy thing? There’s plenty more neo-retro for you, too. Check out the new shorts with a wide, stretchy haramaki attached at the waistband. A haramaki is a traditional Japanese undergarment, a warm and snuggly woolly wrap that people — mostly older men and women of all ages and most famously, Tora-san — wear wrapped around their waists in the winter to keep warm. Wacoal saw the market potential of adding the stomach wrap to their men’s lines after their women’s version sold well over the last several years. Women wear them at temperature extremes, Wacoal found, to protect against both winter weather and overactive summer air conditioners. Now they’re gambling that guys might like to keep their midriffs warm and have a little extra slimming support at the same. The shorts come in boxer and brief varieties, in bright bold colors and small flower patterns.

Since these are being released just as the weather is starting to warm up, the real goal may be more about fashion than old-man practicality. That said, picnicking on those blue tarps at the early spring hanami is always chillier than expected. Going full length with haramaki tights might not be a bad idea.

RSS

Recent Posts