Posts Tagged ‘gifts’

#pulsepresents: gift idea grab bag

Thursday, December 4th, 2014

Stumped about what kind of Christmas gift to give the Japanophile in your life? Here’s a grab bag of possibilities, prepared by Japan Pulse’s elves. And you can follow us on Twitter for more #pulsepresents, tweeted daily.

Commemorative Tokaido Shinkansen KitKats

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Trainspotters will love you forever if you can track down a package of these cool limited edition KitKats, sold in conjunction with the 40th anniversary of the Tokaido Shinkansen. The packaging, depicted a number of classics, can be folded into a mini train. The flavor is, inexplicably, frozen mikan.

Jagarico Panic

In this hot potato-style game, which requires the actual potato snack, players take turns opening up the container to remove a crunchy potato stick. The loser has to draw a penalty card which, in this video, includes a tissue nose probe. Ew.

“The Art of Setting Stones”

For your stressed-out friend, we suggest “The Art of Setting Stones” an overview of traditional Japanese gardens, which describes how the gardens are both “a microcosm of the natural universe and a clear expression of our humanity.”

Ki no Kami Snap Animals

The “Wooden Paper” Snap Animals series lets kids build their own toys by snapping together shapes to construct various animals.

Cardcaptor Sakura Cosmetics

Card Captor Sakura Cosmetic Kit

Cardcaptors of the Clow, expect the unexpected blemish now! A new cosmetic kit featuring Sakura’s magical tools doubles as cute trinkets from the anime and manga series, as well as lip balm and foundation.

Funagata Bags

Designer Kazumi Takigawa has created a new type of canvas bag that has a similar look of the typical brown paper bag but with the functionality and durability of a tote. Each bag is handmade in a variety of shapes and sizes.

Hello Kitty, Hello 40

On her anniversary, 40 fans — from comic artists to toy creators — pay homage to world’s most famous mouthless feline.

Christmas gift ideas 2012

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

Gift-giving at Christmas still isn’t a big tradition in Japan, but that doesn’t let you off the hook. We’ve joined our Japan Times colleagues in doing a little pre-holiday homework for you to take the pressure off. Now all you have to do is whip that wallet out . . .

Tempo Drop

Turning to an app on your smartphone for weather updates, while convenient, can be terribly unexciting. Like a bit of a challenge? With Tempo Drop, you can now forecast the weather by observing the appearance of the liquid in the glass.

S: ¥3990, L: ¥5775, at Cibone

Flex Leather Tray

Too old for a pencil case and too cool for a pencil holder? This minimalistic, sculptable leather tray splits the difference. By the way, know what’s uncool? Not knowing where your supplies are and having to borrow them from the next desk. Tsk.

¥3,990 at 100perstore.com

Hand warmers

With the weather getting frostier by the day — and it hasn’t even started snowing yet! — what could be more useful and relevant than Christmas-y hand warmers? Even the toughest guy would appreciate one in his jacket pocket when battling the cold on the streets.

¥567; all Loft shops

A few Japan Times columnists and editors have also given us a peek at their carefully curated gift lists. You’ll find presents for all your art and design-loving friends as well as stocking stuffers for the film buffs in your life. And don’t forget the folks who love Japanese gadgets! Ho ho ho!

 

Japan by the numbers (06.15.10)

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010

 


Giving the gift of experience

Saturday, June 12th, 2010

Give him something he'll remember

A gift like no other gift

Instead of golf balls or bottles of whiskey for Fathers’ Day, dads in Japan this year may be getting time on the links or a day on a Ducati. “Experience gift catalogs” are gaining in popularity as an easy way to give unusual presents for all occasions.

“I think people are looking for something new,” says Tak Nishimura, CEO of Japan’s first experience gift catalog company. “It’s wonderful to give your mother carnations on Mothers’ day, but I think people like the idea of doing something more original, too. Flowers die. When you give someone an experience, that’s a memory that lasts forever.”

Traditional gift catalogs have been used as a way to give presents to guests at weddings or funerals or prizes to amateur sports winners since the late ’80s. The giver picks a price range and sends the giftee a catalog of items that are all the same pre-specified, undisclosed price. Depending on the brand and price range, the catalogs can include a huge variety of products from fruit, tea, wine and ice cream to jewelry, wallets and designer handbags. Names of popular catalogs, such as “Take Your Choice” and “Ring Bell,” hint at how they work: Pick an item, tell the catalog company, and it’s soon on the doorstep.

As with conventional gift catalogs, the experience giver determines the amount of the present, and the color-coded catalog contains only items that cost that much. At Sow Experience, they go from Blue, in which all the experiences are ¥5,250 to Silver, at ¥52,500. The catalogs, of course, don’t have prices in them. There are catalogs grouped by activity, like dining; occasion, like new baby; or type of recipient, like mother, boyfriend or couple. The activities can be as adventurous or relaxing as the recipient wants, from guided outdoor sports like canyoning and canoeing trips to quieter, safer pursuits like jeweled manicures or time in an oxygen capsule. Fitness buffs could have a yoga or bouldering session, while the fashion-inclined (or challenged) could choose an hour with a stylist. The pottery-throwing lesson is one of the most popular gifts now, Nishimura says. Gifts can be redeemed online.

Nishimura founded Sow Experience in 2005, fresh out of college and looking for a business idea. The concept was becoming popular in England at that time, and he thought it could work in Japan. From the initial 10 experiences, there are now about 100 (the most recent addition is a “doll fashion” class), with 30 new ones added since last year. He says he’s happy to see the swarm of competitors that has sprung up. Beliem, which covers similar options and price points as Sow Experience, will also organize group outings on horseback or cocktail parties at Tokyo’s frozen Icebar, and Iiyu specializes in package trips to hot spring and golf resorts – and ups the ante with experiences for up to ¥105,630.

Nishimura says sales are up 30% over last year, and the company is starting to expand beyond individuals to business-to-business sales: “If someone buys a new car, now, Toyota might give them our experience catalog to choose from as a thank-you present.”

Nishimura says the best part about giving an experience is that it can be the final little push to get someone to do something he’s always wanted to try but never gotten around to. So, what to get the salaryman who has everything? For Fathers’ Day, Sow Experience recommends paragliding, hot stone saunas, a shoe shine or shoe shine lessons. Hey, give a man a shoe shine, and he’s got shiny shoes. Give him shoe shine lessons, and that’s a present he can use for life.

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