Posts Tagged ‘coupons’

Doing your bit for setsuden? Here’s your discount

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

Save energy, save money

Online restaurant guide Guru Nabi (short for “gourmet navigator”) has introduced a series of mobile coupons linked to power-saving efforts this summer. The coupons are in effect from June 30 to Sept. 30, the period during which businesses have been asked to reduce power consumption by 15%. In a first for Guru Nabi, the discounts are available for smartphones as well as Japanese keitai. (The coupons are only available from the mobile version.)

Some bars have half-price drink specials when the temperature (outside, we hope) goes above 35 degrees.  Restaurants have been encouraged to come with topical and fun discounts. A sushi place gives a free piece of sashimi to customers who say “I don’t need any air conditioning!” Another will take 10% off the bill for a rallying cry at the cash register of “Gambare, setsuden [Let's do our best to save power]!” Others reward customers for coming in in super cool biz attire, like Hawaiian shirts or open dress shirts with no necktie. That freebie paper fan you got handed on the street could actually be worth something, too — some places will take ¥1,000  yen the price of the meal for patrons carrying them.

Some seem playfully unconcerned about applying to a wide audience. For one, people with the syllables or kanji for “setsu” “den” “natsu [summer]” or “toku [value]” in their names get a discount. That’s great for the Setsuko’s and Natsumi’s out there, but people with non-Japanese names might be at a slight disadvantage. There’s still a chance  — anyone named Denis out there? Try your luck and let us know how it goes.

Is Facebook’s ‘Check-in Coupon’ a good deal in Japan?

Tuesday, June 21st, 2011

Japan recently became the first country in Asia to get a local version of Facebook Deals, called “Check-in Coupon” here, and Facebook announced the move with an event in Shibuya. (No one who covered the outdoor event could resist giggling at the irony of the local PR staff asking  the audience not to take or share pictures.)

Check in for chicken

The location-based coupons work the same here as in other cities where the service has been implemented. On a smartphone running the Facebook app, the Places feature shows nearby sports where the users can “check in” (i.e., announce to Facebook friends where they are). Shops offering coupons have a yellow icon next to the name. Click on a place with a coupon, and the coupon details appear. If you click again on the shop’s details to check in, you will simultaneously get the coupon displayed on your screen (which you can later show at the register to get your discount) and send a message alerting all your Facebook friends about the coupon. The idea is that it’s a win-win-win: You’ve saved money, the store has gotten a little advertising, and all your friends can congratulate you on your savvy shopping.

That last bit could be where it gets tricky. How many of your coupon acquisitions will your friends comment on before they get annoyed and hide your activity or even defriend you? While anonymous group buying through PomPare and Groupon have proven popular in Japan (though not without great big stumbles), will the Japanese preference for online privacy thwart the extroversion on which the check-in coupon thrives? Of the initial deals offered by the roll-out partners, none is anything we’d risk alienating friends for.

Continue reading about Facebook's Check-in Coupons →

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