Posts Tagged ‘charcoal’

BK’s Kuro Burger to ignite new trend?

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Burger King’s limited edition Kuro Burger

True to its name,  Burger King’s new Kuro Burger has a jet-black bun. The secret ingredient is a dash of bamboo charcoal that BK claims brings out the flame-grilled flavor of the beef. The ketchup is blackened with squid ink. But why? The company says its celebrating its fifth year in Japan with a burger that “defies common sense.” No comment. Aside from the inky ketchup, the burger is the same size and has the same toppings as a regular Whopper, and at ¥450, it costs only ¥30 more. The burgers will be on sale for a limited time starting Friday, Sept. 28.

Could bamboo ash become a trend in cuisine?  Chikutan Hime (Bamboo Charcoal Princess) webstore sells a range of black snacks, including peanuts, senbei rice crackers, and sweet fried karintou. If the hue fits, but you’re not keen on eating burnt wood, then you could get in line in Shibuya for a squid-ink baguette at upmarket French bakery Gontran Cherrier.

Traditional charcoal keepin’ it fresh

Tuesday, September 27th, 2011

Bamboo charcoal is the secret of Sususu's deodorizing power

Concepts often earn the title of “traditional” because they do their job effectively over the centuries. Take the role of charcoal in Sususu, an eco-friendly and attractive house plant that that doubles as a deodorizer. The soil contains tiny particles of odor-eating bamboo charcoal. Fungal bacteria in the charcoal absorbs unpleasant odors in the home rather than masking them with cloying scents.

The soil for Sususu comes in either rectangular or square block shapes and there are three varieties of plant to choose from (two varieties of Sansuberia and one of Pachira). We reckon it’s a nice decorative alternative to using a big aerosol can filled with perfume. However its price tag of ¥2,480 puts it shelf above those oridinary deodorizers.

Sususu is not the only product on the market that utilizes the traditional odor-eating charcoal. Take Dr. Smith’s  bamboo charcoal pillows, which were recently featured at Loft department store in Shibuya. They tout not only deodorizing properties, but also the ability to reduce the humidity in the room by absorbing moisture to create “the perfect sleep environment.”

If you don’t fancy sticking your head on a pile of burnt wood or having the hassle of looking after a plant, then it’s possible to simply buy bamboo charcoal on its own. Taketora sells the stuff on its web shop. Placed around the home in wicker baskets, this blackened bamboo looks surprisingly attractive and works both to reduce humidity and bad smells. Wish we’d known about this product a month ago when Tokyo was both stinky and unpleasantly sweaty!

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