Archive for July, 2015

Make 12th-century art using 21st-century tech

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

choju-giga

The Choju-Giga, the famed animal caricature ink paintings displayed Kyoto’s Kozan-ji Temple have been captivating people for centuries. The four scrolls, which date to the 12th and 13th centuries and depict rabbits and monkeys getting into mischief, are often cited as the first manga comics in Japan’s history.

Now art lovers can create their own masterpieces from the comfort of their Internet browser with the Choju-Giga Construction Kit website.

The site allows users to drag and drop a variety of ink-drawn animals and hiragana letters onto a virtual scroll to make whatever scene they choose. Some of the options include a fiddle-playing frog and a bow-wielding rabbit, giving users numerous story possibilities. The tools — enlarge, shrink, erase — are naturally depicted in hand-drawn calligraphy.

In the Q&A section of the site, the creator basically says he or she simply wanted a free way for users to create classic art. So go forth and roll your own epic scroll, one mouse-click at a time.

Fuji Rock bound? Make sure you survive in style

Friday, July 24th, 2015

fuji-rock-poncho

Raincoats are an essential part of Fuji Rock Festival — but that doesn’t mean they can’t be fun.

When Kenji Miyazawa famously wrote that people shouldn’t lose to rain, wind or the summer heat, we’re sure he was talking about outdoor events such as Fuji Rock Festival. So to survive the event’s unpredictable weather, here are a few items that will help you stay dry, cool and happy.

Because Fuji Rock Festival prohibits umbrellas, raincoats are an essential source of protection against potential downpours. Retro Arcade Poncho is an old-school way to avoid the rain by turning wearers into the enemy ghosts from Namco’s Pac-Man — with the raincoat coming in red for Blinky and blue for Inky. Feel free to chase around anyone or anything round and yellow while wearing your ghostly getup.

In a more practical category, rain boots will come in handy for guests who still want to jump and dance regardless of any mud or puddles. With Packable Boots, people can easily bring along these thin, waterproof rubber boots that can be folded to fit in a limited space.

Although not as terrifying as typhoons, heat can also be troublesome for participants who want to make the most of the outdoor festival. Cool Ruck is a small backpack that looks and feels cool. Developed by Yamamoto Custom Made Sewing Factory, this heat-fighting bag can fit up to a 500g-sized ice pack, which will last for approximately three dance-filled hours.

Participants can also beat the heat with fashionable accessories. Ice-cube earrings, necklaces, and bracelets are bound to have a visually cooling effect on rockers. Equally cool are these swimming pool rings that can keep people in a refreshing state of mind.

Regardless of the weather, summer festivals are a chance for music fans to wear the outfits that they simply can’t rock out at the office. For example, glowing apparel such as LED-installed skirts, parkas, sunglasses and glow-in-the-dark lipstick that will help you shine no matter how dark the night is.

For those about to rock in style, we salute you.

Pokemon ages ungracefully with middle-aged ‘Ojisan Monsters’

Thursday, July 16th, 2015

ojimon1

Someday Pikachu and friends will have to stop following Ash Ketchum around the world, retire from battling and get a real job.

That’s part of idea behind “Ojimon,” a new mobile game that is a portmanteau of ojisan (middle-aged man) and Pokemon. Using “ojiballs,” players can catch aging pocket monsters, who have disturbing Kobito Dukan-like faces, and make them do their bidding.

Players can put their new Ojimon to work in gold mines and construction sites, but they’ll need pay attention: These Poke-oldies have a tendency to doze off on the job but can be woken with a quick jab on the touch screen. If enough gold is harvested, players can build roads to the next town and find new Ojimon to catch.

ojimon2

The game includes the original 150 Pokemon, with graying versions of Charizard, Haunter and Gyarados. Even though it’s not as exciting as battling wild monsters, your Ojimon can still gain experience points through their menial labor and evolve into more powerful forms, albeit with the same sad, unshaven faces.

For an extra laugh (or to avoid copyright infringement), all of the monsters have been given punny names. For example, Fushigidane (Bulbasaur) has been renamed Oyajidane.

“Ojimon” is available for free on Android and iOS.

The new face of Japanese beauty products

Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

Face-off: Japan Times interns model the wide array of beauty masks now available in Japan.

Face-off: Japan Times interns model the wide array of beauty masks now available in Japan.

A wise woman once said that beauty is pain, but that doesn’t mean that it has to be boring. With designer face masks, even the simple act of skin moisturizing can become fun.

Face masks rose to popularity after the 2011 Korean BB Cream craze. Over the past four years, the “lazy girl” alternative to traditional, time-consuming facials has been gaining prominence worldwide. Coated in serums containing everything from collagen and hyaluronic acid to more adventurous ingredients such as snail extract, these face masks claim to moisturize and brighten one’s skin.

To stand out, face mask makers gradually started to experiment with different designs, such as cute pandas or classic kabuki makeup. Inspired by Japanese cosplay (“costume play”), they serve not only as a beauty essential, but also as fun way to remake yourself, if only for 15 to 20 minutes.

These face masks seemed to hit their stride this year. According to a PR representative from beauty company Pure Smile, design face masks first came to being when faced with the question of how to make regular, white face masks more attractive.

Fashion icon Kansai Yamamoto was recruited to design a line of colorful kabuki- themed face masks in March, and beauty company Pure Smile recently teamed up with special makeup artist JIRO to concoct three ghoulish designs for their “Art Mask” line. Prisoner No. 0, Test Subject No. 13 and Type A Zombie were released in early June.

Artist JIRO is already well known for his makeup skills that have transformed models from animals to aliens. In the latest installation to the Pure Smile “Art Mask,” line JIRO lives up to his name by making face masks that nobody would be afraid to answer the door with.

Even Japan’s favorite pear fairy Funassyi has made his mark on the designer face-mask trend, with a limited-edition Funassyi face mask included in one of Pure Smile’s face mask packs.

Of course, there is a built-in marketing value here. Once a private matter, the design mask begs for a selfie to be shared.

Pure Smile is even holding an Art Mask Photo Contest. Art mask enthusiasts can post their pictures to Instagram or Twitter with the hashtag #アートマスクコンテスト, and Pure Smile will select the winners.

A photo posted by manami horie (@mana6314) on

A photo posted by Yui Sato (@ugauga_sato) on

What is the grand prize? Nothing other than a year’s supply of Pure Smile art masks!

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